Zinc supplementation does not affect growth, morbidity, or motor development of U.S. breastfed infants at 4-10 mo

M. J. Heinig, K. H. Brown, B. Lonnerdal, K. G. Dewey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

It has been documented that growth patterns differ between breastfed and formula-fed infants. Some investigators have suggested that these differences are related to differences in zinc intake. We conducted a randomized double-blind intervention trial of zinc supplementation (5 mg/d) versus placebo from 4 to 10 mo of age to evaluate whether there was any impact on growth, morbidity, or motor development of breastfed infants. Growth and indices of body composition and gross motor development were measured monthly from 3 to 10 mo. Morbidity data were collected weekly. 85 subjects were recruited and randomly assigned to one of the two groups; 3 infants (2 zinc, 1 placebo), left the study prior to starting the supplement, 12 subjects (7 zinc, 5 placebo) became ineligible because of excessive formula intake or medical conditions affecting growth. There were no significant differences between groups in baseline characteristics or in attained weight or length at 10 mo, growth velocity, gross motor development, or morbidity even when controlling for potentially confounding variables. These results indicate that differences in growth patterns between breastfed and formula-fed infants are not related to zinc nutriture in our population. Zinc (n=33) Placebo (n=37) Weight for age z-score 10 mo -0.19(1.0) -0.09 (1.0) Length for age z-score 10 mo 0.08 (0.9) 0.07 (1.0) Weight for length z-score 10 mo -0.19 (0.9) -0.04 (1.0) Weight gain 4-10 mo (g/mo) 348 (75) 359 (89) Length gain 4-10 mo (cm/mo) 1.48 (0.15) 1.48 (0.19).

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalFASEB Journal
Volume12
Issue number5
StatePublished - Mar 20 1998

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology

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