Young female vascular surgeons more likely to enter academia

Mimmie Kwong, John G Carson, Julie A. Freischlag, Nasim Hedayati

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective In the last decade, there has been a dramatic increase in the number of women entering vascular surgery. Our goal was to evaluate the differences in career paths based on gender and to determine some of the factors that influence career decisions among young vascular surgeons. Methods A 17-item web-based survey focusing on current employment status, reasons for choosing academic vs nonacademic positions, and career satisfaction was distributed to 900 members of the Society for Vascular Surgery who completed vascular surgery training in the past 10 years. Results A total of 199 individuals responded to the survey (22.1%). The cohort included 49 (24.6%) women and 149 (74.9%) men. The majority of the respondents were non-Hispanic white (66.3%). Sixty-four percent of all respondents were younger than 40 years. Overall, 72.9% of women had applied to academic positions after their training compared with 58.8% of men. Women were more likely to apply for and to work in an academic setting (P =.0266 and P =.0198, respectively) and cited mentorship more frequently (P =.0474) as the reason for choosing an academic practice. Women respondents were less likely to have a spouse or children (P =.0269 and P <.001, respectively). More than 87.4% of all respondents were very satisfied or somewhat satisfied with their careers. However, men were more likely to be very satisfied compared with women (P =.0345). Conclusions Career satisfaction remains high among young vascular surgeons. In this cohort of vascular surgery graduates, we found that women were more likely to pursue academic positions than men, with mentorship, ability to teach, and complexity of cases commonly cited as reasons for this career choice. However, whether young women stay in academia and what factors affect academic retention will need further evaluation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)649-660
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Vascular Surgery
Volume66
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2017

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Blood Vessels
Mentors
Career Choice
A 17
Aptitude
Surgeons
Spouses
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Young female vascular surgeons more likely to enter academia. / Kwong, Mimmie; Carson, John G; Freischlag, Julie A.; Hedayati, Nasim.

In: Journal of Vascular Surgery, Vol. 66, No. 2, 01.08.2017, p. 649-660.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kwong, Mimmie ; Carson, John G ; Freischlag, Julie A. ; Hedayati, Nasim. / Young female vascular surgeons more likely to enter academia. In: Journal of Vascular Surgery. 2017 ; Vol. 66, No. 2. pp. 649-660.
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abstract = "Objective In the last decade, there has been a dramatic increase in the number of women entering vascular surgery. Our goal was to evaluate the differences in career paths based on gender and to determine some of the factors that influence career decisions among young vascular surgeons. Methods A 17-item web-based survey focusing on current employment status, reasons for choosing academic vs nonacademic positions, and career satisfaction was distributed to 900 members of the Society for Vascular Surgery who completed vascular surgery training in the past 10 years. Results A total of 199 individuals responded to the survey (22.1{\%}). The cohort included 49 (24.6{\%}) women and 149 (74.9{\%}) men. The majority of the respondents were non-Hispanic white (66.3{\%}). Sixty-four percent of all respondents were younger than 40 years. Overall, 72.9{\%} of women had applied to academic positions after their training compared with 58.8{\%} of men. Women were more likely to apply for and to work in an academic setting (P =.0266 and P =.0198, respectively) and cited mentorship more frequently (P =.0474) as the reason for choosing an academic practice. Women respondents were less likely to have a spouse or children (P =.0269 and P <.001, respectively). More than 87.4{\%} of all respondents were very satisfied or somewhat satisfied with their careers. However, men were more likely to be very satisfied compared with women (P =.0345). Conclusions Career satisfaction remains high among young vascular surgeons. In this cohort of vascular surgery graduates, we found that women were more likely to pursue academic positions than men, with mentorship, ability to teach, and complexity of cases commonly cited as reasons for this career choice. However, whether young women stay in academia and what factors affect academic retention will need further evaluation.",
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