Yersinia pseudotuberculosis infections in goats and other animals diagnosed at the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System: 1990-2012

Federico Giannitti, Bradd C. Barr, Bárbara P. Brito, Francisco A Uzal, Michelle Villanueva, Mark L Anderson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is a recognized zoonotic food-borne pathogen; however, little is known about the ecology and epidemiology of diseases caused by the bacterium in California. The objective of the current study was to contribute to the knowledge of the diseases caused by Y. pseudotuberculosis in goats, the animal species most frequently reported with clinical yersiniosis to the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System, to better understand the epidemiology of this disease. A 23-year retrospective study was conducted to characterize the syndromes caused by the bacterium in goats and their temporospatial distribution, and to determine the number of cases in other animal species. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis-associated disease was diagnosed in 42 goats from 21 counties, with a strong seasonality in winter and spring. Most cases (88%) were observed within particular years (1999, 2004-2006, 2010-2011). The most frequently diagnosed syndrome was enteritis and/or typhlocolitis (64.3%), followed by abscessation (14.3%), abortion (11.9%), conjunctivitis (4.75%), and hepatitis (4.75%). Among other animal species, 59 cases were diagnosed in non-poultry avian species and 33 in mammals other than goats.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)88-95
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
Volume26
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2014

Keywords

  • Caprine
  • epidemiology
  • pathology
  • temporospatial distribution
  • yersiniosis
  • zoonosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

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