Working memory maintenance contributes to long-term memory formation: Neural and behavioral evidence

Charan Ranganath, Michael X. Cohen, Craig J. Brozinsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

188 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Theories of human memory have led to conflicting views regarding the relationship between working memory (WM) maintenance and episodic long-term memory (LTM) formation. Here, we tested the prediction that WM maintenance operates in two stages, and that processing during the initial stage of WM maintenance promotes successful LTM formation. Results from a functional magnetic resonance imaging study showed that activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and hippocampus during the initial stage of WM maintenance was predictive of subsequent LTM performance. In a behavioral experiment, we demonstrated that interfering with processing during the initial stage of WM maintenance impaired LTM formation. These results demonstrate that processing during the initial stage of WM maintenance directly contributes to successful LTM formation, and that this effect is mediated by a network that includes the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)994-1010
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Cognitive Neuroscience
Volume17
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2005

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Long-Term Memory
Short-Term Memory
Maintenance
Prefrontal Cortex
Hippocampus
Episodic Memory
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this

Working memory maintenance contributes to long-term memory formation : Neural and behavioral evidence. / Ranganath, Charan; Cohen, Michael X.; Brozinsky, Craig J.

In: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, Vol. 17, No. 7, 07.2005, p. 994-1010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ranganath, Charan ; Cohen, Michael X. ; Brozinsky, Craig J. / Working memory maintenance contributes to long-term memory formation : Neural and behavioral evidence. In: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience. 2005 ; Vol. 17, No. 7. pp. 994-1010.
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