Women's willingness and ability to feel the strings of their intrauterine device

Juliana R Melo, Mary Tschann, Reni Soon, Melissa Kuwahara, Bliss Kaneshiro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To determine how many intrauterine device (IUD) users are willing and able to palpate their IUD strings. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among IUD users presenting for their 6-week follow-up visit after insertion at the University of Hawaii, USA, between January 2011 and January 2012. Participants were asked whether they had previously felt the strings and whether they were willing to do so during the visit. Bivariate analyses and multiple logistic regression were performed. Results: Previous attempts to palpate IUD strings were reported by 74 (58.7%) of 126 participants, of whom 49 (66.2%) could feel the strings. At the study visit, 60 (47.6%) participants were willing to try to feel their strings; 33 (55.0%) were successful. Overall, 58 (46.0%) participants were willing and able to palpate their IUD strings at home and/or at the study visit. Fewer women who self-identified as native Hawaiian than women of other races reported previous attempts (P=0.005). Previous instruction to check IUD strings was associated with willingness to palpate them before and after controlling for native Hawaiian race (odds ratio 8.78, 95% CI 3.43–22.43; adjusted odds ratio 9.64, 95% CI 3.57–26.04). Conclusion: Approximately half the participants were willing and able to palpate their IUD strings. Routinely counseling women to check their IUD strings could have limited clinical utility.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)309-313
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics
Volume137
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

Keywords

  • Contraceptive management
  • Follow-up
  • Intrauterine device
  • IUD strings
  • Long-acting reversible contraception

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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