With a little help from my friends? Racial and gender differences in the role of social support in later-life depression medication adherence

Lauren B. Gerlach, Janet Kavanagh, Daphne Watkins, Claire Chiang, Hyungjin M. Kim, Helen C. Kales

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Social support has been shown to be an important factor in improving depression symptom outcomes, yet less is known regarding its impact on antidepressant medication adherence. This study sought to evaluate the role of perceived social support on adherence to new antidepressant medication prescriptions in later-life depression. Methods: Data from two prospective observational studies of participants ≥60 years old, diagnosed with depression, and recently prescribed a new antidepressant (N = 452). Perceived social support was measured using a subscale of the Duke Social Support Index and medication adherence was assessed using a validated self-report measure. Results: At four-month follow up, 68% of patients reported that they were adherent to antidepressant medication. Examining the overall sample, logistic regression analysis demonstrated no significant relationship between perceived social support and medication adherence. However, when stratifying the sample by social support, race, and gender, adherence significantly differed by race and gender in those with inadequate social support: Among those with low social support, African-American females were significantly less likely to adhere to depression treatment than white females (OR = 4.82, 95% CI = 1.14-20.28, p = 0.032) and white males (OR = 3.50, 95% CI = 1.03-11.92, p = 0.045). Conclusions: There is a significant difference in antidepressant medication adherence by race and gender in those with inadequate social support. Tailored treatment interventions for low social support should be sensitive to racial and gender differences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1485-1493
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Psychogeriatrics
Volume29
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

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Keywords

  • antidepressant adherence
  • later-life depression
  • social support

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Gerontology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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