WiFi RFID demonstration for resource tracking in a statewide disaster drill.

Stacey L. Cole, Javeed Siddiqui, David J. Harry, Christian E. Sandrock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To investigate the capabilities of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tracking of patients and medical equipment during a simulated disaster response scenario. RFID infrastructure was deployed at two small rural hospitals, in one large academic medical center and in two vehicles. Several item types from the mutual aid equipment list were selected for tracking during the demonstration. A central database server was installed at the UC Davis Medical Center (UCDMC) that collected RFID information from all constituent sites. The system was tested during a statewide disaster drill. During the drill, volunteers at UCDMC were selected to locate assets using the traditional method of locating resources and then using the RFID system. This study demonstrated the effectiveness of RFID infrastructure in real-time resource identification and tracking. Volunteers at UCDMC were able to locate assets substantially faster using RFID, demonstrating that real-time geolocation can be substantially more efficient and accurate than traditional manual methods. A mobile, Global Positioning System (GPS)-enabled RFID system was installed in a pediatric ambulance and connected to the central RFID database via secure cellular communication. This system is unique in that it provides for seamless region-wide tracking that adaptively uses and seamlessly integrates both outdoor cellular-based mobile tracking and indoor WiFi-based tracking. RFID tracking can provide a real-time picture of the medical situation across medical facilities and other critical locations, leading to a more coordinated deployment of resources. The RFID system deployed during this study demonstrated the potential to improve the ability to locate and track victims, healthcare professionals, and medical equipment during a region-wide disaster.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)155-162
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican journal of disaster medicine
Volume6
Issue number3
StatePublished - May 2011

Fingerprint

Radio Frequency Identification Device
Mandrillus
Disasters
Equipment and Supplies
Volunteers
Patient Identification Systems
Databases
Rural Hospitals
Geographic Information Systems
Aptitude
Ambulances
Communication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

WiFi RFID demonstration for resource tracking in a statewide disaster drill. / Cole, Stacey L.; Siddiqui, Javeed; Harry, David J.; Sandrock, Christian E.

In: American journal of disaster medicine, Vol. 6, No. 3, 05.2011, p. 155-162.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cole, Stacey L. ; Siddiqui, Javeed ; Harry, David J. ; Sandrock, Christian E. / WiFi RFID demonstration for resource tracking in a statewide disaster drill. In: American journal of disaster medicine. 2011 ; Vol. 6, No. 3. pp. 155-162.
@article{a973e1e0485e4d93b092e1bdf8b5ebfd,
title = "WiFi RFID demonstration for resource tracking in a statewide disaster drill.",
abstract = "To investigate the capabilities of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tracking of patients and medical equipment during a simulated disaster response scenario. RFID infrastructure was deployed at two small rural hospitals, in one large academic medical center and in two vehicles. Several item types from the mutual aid equipment list were selected for tracking during the demonstration. A central database server was installed at the UC Davis Medical Center (UCDMC) that collected RFID information from all constituent sites. The system was tested during a statewide disaster drill. During the drill, volunteers at UCDMC were selected to locate assets using the traditional method of locating resources and then using the RFID system. This study demonstrated the effectiveness of RFID infrastructure in real-time resource identification and tracking. Volunteers at UCDMC were able to locate assets substantially faster using RFID, demonstrating that real-time geolocation can be substantially more efficient and accurate than traditional manual methods. A mobile, Global Positioning System (GPS)-enabled RFID system was installed in a pediatric ambulance and connected to the central RFID database via secure cellular communication. This system is unique in that it provides for seamless region-wide tracking that adaptively uses and seamlessly integrates both outdoor cellular-based mobile tracking and indoor WiFi-based tracking. RFID tracking can provide a real-time picture of the medical situation across medical facilities and other critical locations, leading to a more coordinated deployment of resources. The RFID system deployed during this study demonstrated the potential to improve the ability to locate and track victims, healthcare professionals, and medical equipment during a region-wide disaster.",
author = "Cole, {Stacey L.} and Javeed Siddiqui and Harry, {David J.} and Sandrock, {Christian E.}",
year = "2011",
month = "5",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "6",
pages = "155--162",
journal = "American journal of disaster medicine",
issn = "1932-149X",
publisher = "Prime National Publishing Corp.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - WiFi RFID demonstration for resource tracking in a statewide disaster drill.

AU - Cole, Stacey L.

AU - Siddiqui, Javeed

AU - Harry, David J.

AU - Sandrock, Christian E.

PY - 2011/5

Y1 - 2011/5

N2 - To investigate the capabilities of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tracking of patients and medical equipment during a simulated disaster response scenario. RFID infrastructure was deployed at two small rural hospitals, in one large academic medical center and in two vehicles. Several item types from the mutual aid equipment list were selected for tracking during the demonstration. A central database server was installed at the UC Davis Medical Center (UCDMC) that collected RFID information from all constituent sites. The system was tested during a statewide disaster drill. During the drill, volunteers at UCDMC were selected to locate assets using the traditional method of locating resources and then using the RFID system. This study demonstrated the effectiveness of RFID infrastructure in real-time resource identification and tracking. Volunteers at UCDMC were able to locate assets substantially faster using RFID, demonstrating that real-time geolocation can be substantially more efficient and accurate than traditional manual methods. A mobile, Global Positioning System (GPS)-enabled RFID system was installed in a pediatric ambulance and connected to the central RFID database via secure cellular communication. This system is unique in that it provides for seamless region-wide tracking that adaptively uses and seamlessly integrates both outdoor cellular-based mobile tracking and indoor WiFi-based tracking. RFID tracking can provide a real-time picture of the medical situation across medical facilities and other critical locations, leading to a more coordinated deployment of resources. The RFID system deployed during this study demonstrated the potential to improve the ability to locate and track victims, healthcare professionals, and medical equipment during a region-wide disaster.

AB - To investigate the capabilities of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tracking of patients and medical equipment during a simulated disaster response scenario. RFID infrastructure was deployed at two small rural hospitals, in one large academic medical center and in two vehicles. Several item types from the mutual aid equipment list were selected for tracking during the demonstration. A central database server was installed at the UC Davis Medical Center (UCDMC) that collected RFID information from all constituent sites. The system was tested during a statewide disaster drill. During the drill, volunteers at UCDMC were selected to locate assets using the traditional method of locating resources and then using the RFID system. This study demonstrated the effectiveness of RFID infrastructure in real-time resource identification and tracking. Volunteers at UCDMC were able to locate assets substantially faster using RFID, demonstrating that real-time geolocation can be substantially more efficient and accurate than traditional manual methods. A mobile, Global Positioning System (GPS)-enabled RFID system was installed in a pediatric ambulance and connected to the central RFID database via secure cellular communication. This system is unique in that it provides for seamless region-wide tracking that adaptively uses and seamlessly integrates both outdoor cellular-based mobile tracking and indoor WiFi-based tracking. RFID tracking can provide a real-time picture of the medical situation across medical facilities and other critical locations, leading to a more coordinated deployment of resources. The RFID system deployed during this study demonstrated the potential to improve the ability to locate and track victims, healthcare professionals, and medical equipment during a region-wide disaster.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=80052796292&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=80052796292&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 21870664

AN - SCOPUS:80052796292

VL - 6

SP - 155

EP - 162

JO - American journal of disaster medicine

JF - American journal of disaster medicine

SN - 1932-149X

IS - 3

ER -