Whole-genome sequencing of drugresistant Salmonella enterica isolates from dairy cattle and humans in New York and Washington States reveals source and geographic associations

Laura M. Carroll, Martin Wiedmann, Henk den Bakker, Julie Siler, Steven Warchocki, David Kent, Svetlana Lyalina, Margaret Davis, William Sischo, Thomas Besser, Lorin D. Warnick, Richard Van Vleck Pereira

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Scopus citations

Abstract

Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica can be spread from cattle to humans through direct contact with animals shedding Salmonella as well as through the food chain, making MDR Salmonella a serious threat to human health. The objective of this study was to use whole-genome sequencing to compare antimicrobial-resistant (AMR) Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium, Newport, and Dublin isolated from dairy cattle and humans in Washington State and New York State at the genotypic and phenotypic levels. A total of 90 isolates were selected for the study (37 S. Typhimurium, 32 S. Newport, and 21 S. Dublin isolates). All isolates were tested for phenotypic antibiotic resistance to 12 drugs using Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion. AMR genes were detected in the assembled genome of each isolate using nucleotide BLAST and ARG-ANNOT. Genotypic prediction of phenotypic resistance resulted in a mean sensitivity of 97.2 and specificity of 85.2. Sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim resistance was observed only in human isolates (P < 0.05), while resistance to quinolones and fluoroquinolones was observed only in 6 S. Typhimurium isolates from humans in Washington State. S. Newport isolates showed a high degree of AMR profile similarity, regardless of source. S. Dublin isolates from New York State differed from those from Washington State based on the presence/ absence of plasmid replicons, as well as phenotypic AMR susceptibility/nonsusceptibility (P < 0.05). The results of this study suggest that distinct factors may contribute to the emergence and dispersal of AMR S. enterica in humans and farm animals in different regions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere00140-17
JournalApplied and Environmental Microbiology
Volume83
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

Keywords

  • Dairy cattle
  • Drug resistance evolution
  • Genomics
  • Nontyphoidal Salmonella
  • Whole-genome sequencing
  • Zoonosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Food Science
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
  • Ecology

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