Whirling disease

Host specificity and interaction between the actinosporean stage of Myxobolus cerebralis and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss

M. El-Matbouli, R. W. Hoffmann, H. Schoel, T. S. McDowell, Ronald Hedrick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

89 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Scanning electron microscopic studies were conducted on rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss in the first 60 min after their exposure to the triactinomyxon spores of Myxobolus cerebralis. The results demonstrated that as early as 1 min post exposure the whole process, from the attachment of the triactinomyxon spores to the complete penetration of their sporoplasm germs, had occurred. The triactinomyxon spores sought out the secretory openings of mucous cells of the epidermis, the respiratory epithelium and the buccal cavity of trout and used them as portals of entry. Exposure experiments of the triactinomyxon spores of M. cerebralis to non-salmonid fish, such as goldfish Carassius auratus, carp Cyprinus carpio, nose Chondrostoma nasus, medaka Oryzias latipes, guppy Poecilia reticulata and also the amphibian tadpole Rana pipiens as well as to rainbow trout fry indicated a specificity for salmonids. Attempts to activate the triactinomyxon spores by exposure to mucus prepared from cyprinid and salmonid fish showed no significant differences from those conducted in tap water. The results suggest that the simultaneous presence of both mechano- and chemotactic stimuli was required for finding the salmonid fish host.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-12
Number of pages12
JournalDiseases of Aquatic Organisms
Volume35
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 7 1999

Fingerprint

whirling disease
Myxobolus cerebralis
host specificity
rainbow
spore
Oncorhynchus mykiss
spores
Poecilia reticulata
salmonid
fish
respiratory mucosa
Rana pipiens
Oryzias latipes
Carassius auratus
cyprinid
goldfish
mucus
epidermis (animal)
tap water
tadpoles

Keywords

  • Host specificity
  • Myxobolus cerebralis
  • Triactinomyxon
  • Whirling disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Aquatic Science

Cite this

Whirling disease : Host specificity and interaction between the actinosporean stage of Myxobolus cerebralis and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. / El-Matbouli, M.; Hoffmann, R. W.; Schoel, H.; McDowell, T. S.; Hedrick, Ronald.

In: Diseases of Aquatic Organisms, Vol. 35, No. 1, 07.01.1999, p. 1-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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