When the Female Heart Stops: Sex and Gender Differences in Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest Epidemiology and Resuscitation

Angela F. Jarman, Bryn E. Mumma, Sarah M. Perman, Pavitra Kotini-Shah, Alyson J. McGregor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Sex- and gender-based differences are emerging as clinically significant in the epidemiology and resuscitation of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Female patients tend to be older, experience arrest in private locations, and have fewer initial shockable rhythms (ventricular fibrillation/ventricular tachycardia). Despite standardized algorithms for the management of OHCA, women are less likely to receive evidence-based interventions, including advanced cardiac life support medications, percutaneous coronary intervention, and targeted temperature management. While some data suggest a protective mechanism of estrogen in the heart, brain, and kidney, its role is incompletely understood. Female patients experience higher mortality from OHCA, prompting the need for sex-specific research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalClinical Therapeutics
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest
Resuscitation
Sex Characteristics
Epidemiology
Advanced Cardiac Life Support
Ventricular Fibrillation
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Ventricular Tachycardia
Estrogens
Kidney
Temperature
Mortality
Brain
Research

Keywords

  • emergency medical services
  • epidemiology
  • evidence-based medicine
  • out-of-hospital cardiac arrest
  • resuscitation
  • sex and gender

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

When the Female Heart Stops : Sex and Gender Differences in Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest Epidemiology and Resuscitation. / Jarman, Angela F.; Mumma, Bryn E.; Perman, Sarah M.; Kotini-Shah, Pavitra; McGregor, Alyson J.

In: Clinical Therapeutics, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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