When an omitted curriculum becomes a hidden curriculum: Let’s teach to promote health equity

Kupiri Ackerman-Barger, Maya London, Dejuan White

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Omitting topics such as the social determinants of health and the relationship between discrimination and allostatic load on individuals and communities conveys an implicit message about the health and health outcomes of people of color. This is an example of a hidden curriculum in health professions schools. This qualitative study includes the insights of 54 medical or nursing students belonging to groups underrepresented in the health professions. The students came from three academic health institutions and were asked about microaggressions they may have experienced as students. The data highlight participants’ perceptions of curricular deficits and a hidden curriculum and indicate the need for curriculum reform in schools of nursing and schools of medicine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)182-192
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved
Volume31
Issue number4
StatePublished - 2020

Keywords

  • Curriculum reform
  • Health disparities
  • Health equity
  • Hidden curriculum
  • Microaggressions
  • Race and racism
  • Social determinants of health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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