What have we learned from highly time-resolved measurements during EPA's supersites program and related studies?

Anthony S. Wexler, Murray V. Johnston

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A wide range of new and exciting highly time-resolved instruments were deployed during the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Supersite program and related studies that occurred during the same time period. These measurements elucidated the temporal variation of a suite of gas-phase species, particle physical properties, and size-resolved particulate chemical composition. Because the temporal resolution was so high, concentration and size distribution changes as short as 1 min or less were discerned. Often data from multiple instruments were correlated with each other and with meteorological measurements, and these correlations enabled conclusions to be drawn about the photochemical activity of the atmosphere, the location of point sources, and even the emissions characteristics of these sources. For instance, rapid changes in particulate matter (PM) concentration were due to meteorological conditions, emissions, and plume excursions that led to increases in nitrate, sulfate, and organic carbon concentrations. This paper summarizes the conclusions that have been reached, to date, using these new, highly time-resolved instruments, and demonstrates their promise for future studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)303-319
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of the Air and Waste Management Association
Volume58
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008

Fingerprint

Time measurement
Particulate Matter
Environmental Protection Agency
Organic carbon
Nitrates
point source
particulate matter
temporal variation
Physical properties
plume
physical property
Gases
chemical composition
organic carbon
sulfate
nitrate
atmosphere
Chemical analysis
gas
programme

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atmospheric Science
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry

Cite this

What have we learned from highly time-resolved measurements during EPA's supersites program and related studies? / Wexler, Anthony S.; Johnston, Murray V.

In: Journal of the Air and Waste Management Association, Vol. 58, No. 2, 2008, p. 303-319.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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