What Cut-Point in Gait Speed Best Discriminates Community-Dwelling Older Adults With Mobility Complaints From Those Without? A Pooled Analysis From the Sarcopenia Definitions and Outcomes Consortium

Peggy M. Cawthon, Sheena M. Patel, Stephen B. Kritchevsky, Anne B. Newman, Adam Santanasto, Douglas P. Kiel, Thomas G. Travison, Nancy Lane, Steven R. Cummings, Eric S. Orwoll, Kate A. Duchowny, Timothy Kwok, Vasant Hirani, John Schousboe, Magnus K. Karlsson, Dan Mellström, Claes Ohlsson, Östen Ljunggren, Qian Li Xue, Michelle ShardellJoanne M. Jordan, Karol M. Pencina, Roger A. Fielding, Jay Magaziner, Rosaly Correa-de-Araujo, Shalender Bhasin, Todd M. Manini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Cut-points to define slow walking speed have largely been derived from expert opinion. METHODS: Study participants (13 589 men and 5043 women aged ≥65years) had walking speed (m/s) measured over 4-6 m (mean ± SD: 1.20 ± 0.27 m/s in men and 0.94 ± 0.24 m/s in women.) Mobility limitation was defined as any self-reported difficulty with walking approximately 1/4 mile (prevalence: 12.6% men, 26.4% women). Sex-stratified classification and regression tree (CART) models with 10-fold cross-validation identified walking speed cut-points that optimally discriminated those who reported mobility limitation from those who did not. RESULTS: Among 5043 women, CART analysis identified 2 cut-points, classifying 4144 (82.2%) with walking speed ≥0.75 m/s, which we labeled as "fast"; 478 (9.5%) as "intermediate" (walking speed ≥0.62 m/s but <0.75 m/s); and 421 (8.3%) as "slow" (walking speed <0.62 m/s). Among 13 589 men, CART analysis identified 3 cut-points, classifying 10 001 (73.6%) with walking speed ≥1.00 m/s ("very fast"); 2901 (21.3%) as "fast" (walking speed ≥0.74 m/s but <1.00 m/s); 497 (3.7%) as "intermediate" (walking speed ≥0.57 m/s but <0.74 m/s); and 190 (1.4%) as "slow" (walking speed <0.57 m/s). Prevalence of self-reported mobility limitation was lowest in the "fast" or "very fast" (11% for men and 19% for women) and highest in the "slow" (60.5% in men and 71.0% in women). Rounding the 2 slower cut-points to 0.60 m/s and 0.75 m/s reclassified very few participants. CONCLUSIONS: Cut-points in walking speed of approximately 0.60 m/s and 0.75 m/s discriminate those with self-reported mobility limitation from those without.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e321-e327
JournalThe journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences
Volume76
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 13 2021

Keywords

  • Classification and regression trees
  • Gait speed
  • Mobility limitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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