Westernizing Diets Influence Fat Intake, Red Blood Cell Fatty Acid Composition, and Health in Remote Alaskan Native Communities in the Center for Alaska Native Health Study

Andrea Bersamin, Bret R. Luick, Irena B. King, Judith S. Stern, Sheri Zidenberg-Cherr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objective: To investigate the impact of a Westernizing diet on fat intake, red blood cell fatty acid composition, and health risks among Yup'ik Eskimos living in rural Alaskan Native communities. Design: Diet data and blood specimens were collected from 530 Yup'ik Eskimos aged 14 to 94 years old. Height, weight, and waist circumference were measured. Statistical analyses: Comparisons of select fatty acid intake between participants in quintiles of traditional food intake (percent energy) were made using analyses of variance and post hoc Bonferroni tests. General linear models were used to determine the association between traditional food intake and health outcomes. Results: Fatty acid composition of the diet differed according to the level of traditional food intake. Traditional food intake was positively associated with higher total fat, eicosapentaenoic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid intake. No association was observed between traditional food intake and saturated fatty acid intake; indeed, participants consuming more traditional foods derived a substantially smaller proportion of their dietary fatty acids from saturated fatty acids (P<0.001). Analyses of red blood cell fatty acid composition supported these findings. After multivariable adjustment, traditional food intake was significantly positively associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration and significantly negatively associated with triglyceride concentration (P<0.001). Conclusions: Diets emphasizing traditional Alaskan Native foods were associated with a fatty acid profile promoting greater cardiovascular health than diets emphasizing Western foods. Further research needs to evaluate the effects of a Westernizing diet on the overall diet of Alaskan Natives.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)266-273
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American Dietetic Association
Volume108
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Alaska Natives
traditional foods
fat intake
Population Groups
erythrocytes
Fatty Acids
Erythrocytes
fatty acid composition
food intake
Diet
Eating
Health
diet
Eskimos
Inuits
saturated fatty acids
Food
waist circumference
Eicosapentaenoic Acid
eicosapentaenoic acid

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Westernizing Diets Influence Fat Intake, Red Blood Cell Fatty Acid Composition, and Health in Remote Alaskan Native Communities in the Center for Alaska Native Health Study. / Bersamin, Andrea; Luick, Bret R.; King, Irena B.; Stern, Judith S.; Zidenberg-Cherr, Sheri.

In: Journal of the American Dietetic Association, Vol. 108, No. 2, 02.2008, p. 266-273.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective: To investigate the impact of a Westernizing diet on fat intake, red blood cell fatty acid composition, and health risks among Yup'ik Eskimos living in rural Alaskan Native communities. Design: Diet data and blood specimens were collected from 530 Yup'ik Eskimos aged 14 to 94 years old. Height, weight, and waist circumference were measured. Statistical analyses: Comparisons of select fatty acid intake between participants in quintiles of traditional food intake (percent energy) were made using analyses of variance and post hoc Bonferroni tests. General linear models were used to determine the association between traditional food intake and health outcomes. Results: Fatty acid composition of the diet differed according to the level of traditional food intake. Traditional food intake was positively associated with higher total fat, eicosapentaenoic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid intake. No association was observed between traditional food intake and saturated fatty acid intake; indeed, participants consuming more traditional foods derived a substantially smaller proportion of their dietary fatty acids from saturated fatty acids (P<0.001). Analyses of red blood cell fatty acid composition supported these findings. After multivariable adjustment, traditional food intake was significantly positively associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration and significantly negatively associated with triglyceride concentration (P<0.001). Conclusions: Diets emphasizing traditional Alaskan Native foods were associated with a fatty acid profile promoting greater cardiovascular health than diets emphasizing Western foods. Further research needs to evaluate the effects of a Westernizing diet on the overall diet of Alaskan Natives.",
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