Weight gain in gonadectomized normal and lipoprotein lipase-deficient male domestic cats results from increased food intake and not decreased energy expenditure

Marc L. Kanchuk, Robert C. Backus, Christopher C. Calvert, James G. Morris, Quinton R. Rogers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

56 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Gonadectomy predisposes domestic cats to undesired body weight gain and obesity. The disturbance responsible for this disregulation of energy balance has not been clearly identified. Energy intake and expenditure, body composition and plasma concentrations of leptin, insulin, glucose and triacylglycerol were determined during a 36-wk period in adult male (2-5 y) gonadectomized (n = 8) and intact (n = 8) normal cats and gonadectomized (n = 8) and intact (n = 8) lipoprotein lipase (LPL)-deficient cats. Cats were housed individually in temperature- and light-controlled rooms and continuously provided a commercial dry-type diet. In normal and LPL-deficient cats, body weight increased (P < 0.05) after gonadectomy by 27 to 29%, mostly as a result of fat accretion. There was a rapid increase (P < 0.05) in food intake of -12% after gonadectomy of normal and LPL-deficient cats. The metabolic rate (kJ·kg-1·d-1), determined in normal intact (319 ± 20, n = 5) and gonadectomized (332 ± 36, n = 5) cats, did not differ after gonadectomy. After gonadectomy, plasma concentrations of glucose and triacylglycerol did not change, whereas plasma insulin and leptin concentrations increased (P < 0.05), but not coincidentally with body weight gain. A stair-step increase in energy intake, and not decreased energy expenditure, appears to drive the weight gain associated with gonadectomy. Body fat mass appears to increase until the energy intake supports no further expansion. Adiposity signaling through insulin or leptin does not appear to mediate the energy intake effect. LPL deficiency did not preclude development of the overweight body condition. Therefore, gonadectomy-induced weight gain in cats is not a result of changed adipose LPL activity, as previously suggested.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1866-1874
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume133
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 1 2003

Fingerprint

Lipoprotein Lipase
Energy Metabolism
Weight Gain
Cats
Eating
Energy Intake
Leptin
Body Weight
Insulin
Triglycerides
Hyperlipoproteinemia Type I
Glucose
Adiposity
Body Composition
Adipose Tissue
Obesity
Fats
Diet
Light
Temperature

Keywords

  • Food intake
  • Insulin
  • Leptin
  • Metabolic rate
  • Neutering

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Weight gain in gonadectomized normal and lipoprotein lipase-deficient male domestic cats results from increased food intake and not decreased energy expenditure. / Kanchuk, Marc L.; Backus, Robert C.; Calvert, Christopher C.; Morris, James G.; Rogers, Quinton R.

In: Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 133, No. 6, 01.06.2003, p. 1866-1874.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Gonadectomy predisposes domestic cats to undesired body weight gain and obesity. The disturbance responsible for this disregulation of energy balance has not been clearly identified. Energy intake and expenditure, body composition and plasma concentrations of leptin, insulin, glucose and triacylglycerol were determined during a 36-wk period in adult male (2-5 y) gonadectomized (n = 8) and intact (n = 8) normal cats and gonadectomized (n = 8) and intact (n = 8) lipoprotein lipase (LPL)-deficient cats. Cats were housed individually in temperature- and light-controlled rooms and continuously provided a commercial dry-type diet. In normal and LPL-deficient cats, body weight increased (P < 0.05) after gonadectomy by 27 to 29{\%}, mostly as a result of fat accretion. There was a rapid increase (P < 0.05) in food intake of -12{\%} after gonadectomy of normal and LPL-deficient cats. The metabolic rate (kJ·kg-1·d-1), determined in normal intact (319 ± 20, n = 5) and gonadectomized (332 ± 36, n = 5) cats, did not differ after gonadectomy. After gonadectomy, plasma concentrations of glucose and triacylglycerol did not change, whereas plasma insulin and leptin concentrations increased (P < 0.05), but not coincidentally with body weight gain. A stair-step increase in energy intake, and not decreased energy expenditure, appears to drive the weight gain associated with gonadectomy. Body fat mass appears to increase until the energy intake supports no further expansion. Adiposity signaling through insulin or leptin does not appear to mediate the energy intake effect. LPL deficiency did not preclude development of the overweight body condition. Therefore, gonadectomy-induced weight gain in cats is not a result of changed adipose LPL activity, as previously suggested.",
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