Weakness and strength training in persons with poststroke hemiplegia: Rationale, method, and efficacy

Carolynn Patten, Jan Lexell, Heather E. Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

200 Scopus citations

Abstract

Several converging lines of contemporary evidence suggest that weakness presents a more serious compromise to movement function in poststroke hemiplegia than spasticity. This review examines the clinical and functional phenomena of weakness in poststroke hemiplegia, currently available evidence identifying physiologic substrates contri-buting to weakness, and reports of early investigations involving high-resistance training targeted at improving strength and the transfer of strength to improvements in functional capacity. Based on this information, we describe some unsolved problems and indicate some likely lines of development to increase our knowledge regarding how resistance training can be included in effective stroke rehabilitation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)293-312
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Rehabilitation Research and Development
Volume41
Issue number3 A
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adaptation, physiological
  • Cerebrovascular accident
  • Evidence-based medicine
  • Hemiplegia
  • Muscle weakness
  • Muscles, skeletal
  • Recovery of function
  • Rehabilitation
  • Treatment outcome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Weakness and strength training in persons with poststroke hemiplegia: Rationale, method, and efficacy'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this