Walnuts change lipoprotein composition suppressing TNFα-stimulated cytokine production by diabetic adipocyte

Kamil Borkowski, Sun J. Yim, Roberta R. Holt, Robert M. Hackman, Carl L Keen, John W. Newman, Gregory C. Shearer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Walnut consumption can provide both vascular and metabolic health benefits, and walnut-induced changes in lipoprotein particle chemical payloads may be responsible for these health benefits. To explore this possibility with a focus on metabolic health, this study investigated the impact of walnut consumption on lipoprotein lipid composition and changes in LDL anti-inflammatory properties, as reported by inflamed adipocyte. Hypercholesterolemic, postmenopausal females were treated with 40 g/day (i.e., 1.6 servings/day; n=15) of walnuts for 4 weeks. Fatty acids and their oxygenated metabolites, i.e., oxylipins, were quantified in isolated lipoproteins. Human primary adipocytes were exposed to LDL and TNFα-stimulated adipokine production was measured. Walnut treatment elevated α-linolenic acid and its epoxides in all lipoproteins and depleted mid-chain alcohols in VLDL and LDL, but not HDL. Walnuts also reduced TNFα-induced diabetic adipocyte production of IL-6 (−48%, P=.0006) and IL-8 (−30%, P=.01), changes inversely correlated with levels of α-linolenic acid-derived epoxides but not α-linolenic acid itself. In conclusion, modest walnut consumption can alter lipoprotein lipid profiles and enhance their ability to inhibit TNFα-dependent pro-inflammatory responses in human diabetic primary adipocytes. Moreover, this study suggests the oxylipins, rather than the parent fatty acids, mediate LDL action of adipocytes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)51-58
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Nutritional Biochemistry
Volume68
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2019

Fingerprint

Juglans
Adipocytes
Lipoproteins
alpha-Linolenic Acid
Cytokines
Oxylipins
Chemical analysis
Epoxy Compounds
Health
Fatty Acids
Insurance Benefits
Lipids
Adipokines
Metabolites
Interleukin-8
Interleukin-6
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Alcohols
Blood Vessels
oxidized low density lipoprotein

Keywords

  • Adipocytes
  • Diet
  • Dietary lipids
  • LDL
  • Lipid mediators
  • Lipoprotein metabolism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Clinical Biochemistry

Cite this

Walnuts change lipoprotein composition suppressing TNFα-stimulated cytokine production by diabetic adipocyte. / Borkowski, Kamil; Yim, Sun J.; Holt, Roberta R.; Hackman, Robert M.; Keen, Carl L; Newman, John W.; Shearer, Gregory C.

In: Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, Vol. 68, 01.06.2019, p. 51-58.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Borkowski, Kamil ; Yim, Sun J. ; Holt, Roberta R. ; Hackman, Robert M. ; Keen, Carl L ; Newman, John W. ; Shearer, Gregory C. / Walnuts change lipoprotein composition suppressing TNFα-stimulated cytokine production by diabetic adipocyte. In: Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry. 2019 ; Vol. 68. pp. 51-58.
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