Walking stabilizes cognitive functioning in Alzheimer's disease (AD) across one year

J. Winchester, M. B. Dick, D. Gillen, Bruce R Reed, B. Miller, J. Tinklenberg, Dan M Mungas, H. Chui, D. Galasko, L. Hewett, C. W. Cotman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

61 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

AD is a public health epidemic, which seriously impacts cognition, mood and daily activities; however, one type of activity, exercise, has been shown to alter these states. Accordingly, we sought to investigate the relationship between exercise and mood, in early-stage AD patients (N=104) from California, over a 1-year period. Patients completed the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), and Blessed-Roth Dementia Rating Scale (BRDRS), while their caregivers completed the Yale Physical Activity Survey (YALE), Profile of Mood States (POMS), the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) and Functional Abilities Questionnaire (FAQ). Approximately half of the participants were female, from a variety of ethnic groups (Caucasian. =69.8%; Latino/Hispanic Americans. =20.1%). Our results demonstrated that the patients spent little time engaged in physical activity in general, their overall activity levels decreased over time, and this was paired with a change in global cognition (e.g., MMSE total score) and affect/mood (e.g., POMS score). Patients were parsed into Active and Sedentary groups based on their Yale profiles, with Active participants engaged in walking activities, weekly, over 1 year. Here, Sedentary patients had a significant decline in MMSE scores, while the Active patients had an attenuation in global cognitive decline. Importantly, among the Active AD patients, those individuals who engaged in walking for more than 2. h/week had a significant improvement in MMSE scores. Structured clinical trials which seek to increase the amount of time AD patients were engaged in walking activities and evaluate the nature and scope of beneficial effects in the brain are warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)96-103
Number of pages8
JournalArchives of Gerontology and Geriatrics
Volume56
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2013

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dementia
Walking
Alzheimer Disease
mood
Exercise
examination
Hispanic Americans
cognition
Cognition
geriatrics
Aptitude
rating scale
Caucasian
caregiver
Ethnic Groups
Geriatrics
brain
ethnic group
Caregivers
Dementia

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's
  • Cognitive decline
  • Exercise
  • Mild impairment
  • MMSE
  • Physical activity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Health(social science)
  • Gerontology

Cite this

Walking stabilizes cognitive functioning in Alzheimer's disease (AD) across one year. / Winchester, J.; Dick, M. B.; Gillen, D.; Reed, Bruce R; Miller, B.; Tinklenberg, J.; Mungas, Dan M; Chui, H.; Galasko, D.; Hewett, L.; Cotman, C. W.

In: Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Vol. 56, No. 1, 01.2013, p. 96-103.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Winchester, J, Dick, MB, Gillen, D, Reed, BR, Miller, B, Tinklenberg, J, Mungas, DM, Chui, H, Galasko, D, Hewett, L & Cotman, CW 2013, 'Walking stabilizes cognitive functioning in Alzheimer's disease (AD) across one year', Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, vol. 56, no. 1, pp. 96-103. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.archger.2012.06.016
Winchester, J. ; Dick, M. B. ; Gillen, D. ; Reed, Bruce R ; Miller, B. ; Tinklenberg, J. ; Mungas, Dan M ; Chui, H. ; Galasko, D. ; Hewett, L. ; Cotman, C. W. / Walking stabilizes cognitive functioning in Alzheimer's disease (AD) across one year. In: Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics. 2013 ; Vol. 56, No. 1. pp. 96-103.
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