Voltage-gated potassium channels as therapeutic targets

Heike Wulff, Neil A. Castle, Luis A. Pardo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

411 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The human genome encodes 40 voltage-gated K + channels (K V), which are involved in diverse physiological processes ranging from repolarization of neuronal and cardiac action potentials, to regulating Ca 2+ signalling and cell volume, to driving cellular proliferation and migration. KV channels offer tremendous opportunities for the development of new drugs to treat cancer, autoimmune diseases and metabolic, neurological and cardiovascular disorders. This Review discusses pharmacological strategies for targeting KV channels with venom peptides, antibodies and small molecules, and highlights recent progress in the preclinical and clinical development of drugs targeting the K V 1 subfamily, the KV 7 subfamily (also known as KCNQ), KV 10.1 (also known as EAG1 and KCNH1) and KV 11.1 (also known as HERG and KCNH2) channels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)982-1001
Number of pages20
JournalNature Reviews Drug Discovery
Volume8
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2009

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Physiological Phenomena
Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels
Venoms
Human Genome
Drug Delivery Systems
Nervous System Diseases
Cell Size
Autoimmune Diseases
Action Potentials
Cell Proliferation
Pharmacology
Peptides
Antibodies
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Neoplasms
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Drug Discovery
  • Pharmacology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Voltage-gated potassium channels as therapeutic targets. / Wulff, Heike; Castle, Neil A.; Pardo, Luis A.

In: Nature Reviews Drug Discovery, Vol. 8, No. 12, 12.2009, p. 982-1001.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wulff, Heike ; Castle, Neil A. ; Pardo, Luis A. / Voltage-gated potassium channels as therapeutic targets. In: Nature Reviews Drug Discovery. 2009 ; Vol. 8, No. 12. pp. 982-1001.
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