Volatilization of low vapor pressure - volatile organic compounds (LVP-VOCs) during three cleaning products-associated activities

Potential contributions to ozone formation

Hyeong Moo Shin, Thomas E. McKone, Deborah H Bennett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There have been many studies to reduce ozone formation mostly from volatile organic compound (VOC) sources. However, the role of low vapor pressure (LVP)-VOCs from consumer products remains mostly unexplored and unaddressed. This study explores the impact of high production volume LVP-VOCs on ozone formation from three cleaning products-associated activities (dishwashing, clothes washing, and surface cleaning). We develop a model framework to account for the portion available for ozone formation during the use phase and from the down-the-drain disposal. We apply experimental studies that measured emission rates or models that were developed for estimating emission rates of organic compounds during the use phase. Then, the fraction volatilized (fvolatilized) and the fraction disposed down the drain (fdown-the-drain) are multiplied by the portion available for ozone formation for releases to the outdoor air (fO3|volatilized) and down-the-drain (fO3|down-the-drain), respectively. Overall, for chemicals used in three specific cleaning-product uses, fvolatilized is less than 0.6% for all studied LVP-VOCs. Because greater than 99.4% of compounds are disposed of down the drain during the use phase, when combined with fO3|volatilized and fO3|down-the-drain, the portion available for ozone formation from the direct releases to outdoor air and the down-the-drain disposal is less than 0.4% and 0.2%, respectively. The results from this study indicate that the impact of the studied LVP-VOCs on ozone formation is very sensitive to what occurs during the use phase and suggest the need for future research on experimental work at the point of use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)130-137
Number of pages8
JournalChemosphere
Volume153
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2016

Fingerprint

Vapor Pressure
Volatile Organic Compounds
Volatilization
Ozone
Vapor pressure
volatilization
Volatile organic compounds
Vaporization
vapor pressure
drain
volatile organic compound
low pressure
Cleaning
ozone
Air
Surface cleaning
Clothing
Consumer products
Organic compounds
Washing

Keywords

  • Cleaning product
  • Consumer product
  • Low vapor pressure-volatile organic compounds
  • Ozone
  • Volatilization model

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

@article{a5f7c4efc277456484d0b8e0606992ac,
title = "Volatilization of low vapor pressure - volatile organic compounds (LVP-VOCs) during three cleaning products-associated activities: Potential contributions to ozone formation",
abstract = "There have been many studies to reduce ozone formation mostly from volatile organic compound (VOC) sources. However, the role of low vapor pressure (LVP)-VOCs from consumer products remains mostly unexplored and unaddressed. This study explores the impact of high production volume LVP-VOCs on ozone formation from three cleaning products-associated activities (dishwashing, clothes washing, and surface cleaning). We develop a model framework to account for the portion available for ozone formation during the use phase and from the down-the-drain disposal. We apply experimental studies that measured emission rates or models that were developed for estimating emission rates of organic compounds during the use phase. Then, the fraction volatilized (fvolatilized) and the fraction disposed down the drain (fdown-the-drain) are multiplied by the portion available for ozone formation for releases to the outdoor air (fO3|volatilized) and down-the-drain (fO3|down-the-drain), respectively. Overall, for chemicals used in three specific cleaning-product uses, fvolatilized is less than 0.6{\%} for all studied LVP-VOCs. Because greater than 99.4{\%} of compounds are disposed of down the drain during the use phase, when combined with fO3|volatilized and fO3|down-the-drain, the portion available for ozone formation from the direct releases to outdoor air and the down-the-drain disposal is less than 0.4{\%} and 0.2{\%}, respectively. The results from this study indicate that the impact of the studied LVP-VOCs on ozone formation is very sensitive to what occurs during the use phase and suggest the need for future research on experimental work at the point of use.",
keywords = "Cleaning product, Consumer product, Low vapor pressure-volatile organic compounds, Ozone, Volatilization model",
author = "Shin, {Hyeong Moo} and McKone, {Thomas E.} and Bennett, {Deborah H}",
year = "2016",
month = "6",
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doi = "10.1016/j.chemosphere.2016.02.131",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "153",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Volatilization of low vapor pressure - volatile organic compounds (LVP-VOCs) during three cleaning products-associated activities

T2 - Potential contributions to ozone formation

AU - Shin, Hyeong Moo

AU - McKone, Thomas E.

AU - Bennett, Deborah H

PY - 2016/6/1

Y1 - 2016/6/1

N2 - There have been many studies to reduce ozone formation mostly from volatile organic compound (VOC) sources. However, the role of low vapor pressure (LVP)-VOCs from consumer products remains mostly unexplored and unaddressed. This study explores the impact of high production volume LVP-VOCs on ozone formation from three cleaning products-associated activities (dishwashing, clothes washing, and surface cleaning). We develop a model framework to account for the portion available for ozone formation during the use phase and from the down-the-drain disposal. We apply experimental studies that measured emission rates or models that were developed for estimating emission rates of organic compounds during the use phase. Then, the fraction volatilized (fvolatilized) and the fraction disposed down the drain (fdown-the-drain) are multiplied by the portion available for ozone formation for releases to the outdoor air (fO3|volatilized) and down-the-drain (fO3|down-the-drain), respectively. Overall, for chemicals used in three specific cleaning-product uses, fvolatilized is less than 0.6% for all studied LVP-VOCs. Because greater than 99.4% of compounds are disposed of down the drain during the use phase, when combined with fO3|volatilized and fO3|down-the-drain, the portion available for ozone formation from the direct releases to outdoor air and the down-the-drain disposal is less than 0.4% and 0.2%, respectively. The results from this study indicate that the impact of the studied LVP-VOCs on ozone formation is very sensitive to what occurs during the use phase and suggest the need for future research on experimental work at the point of use.

AB - There have been many studies to reduce ozone formation mostly from volatile organic compound (VOC) sources. However, the role of low vapor pressure (LVP)-VOCs from consumer products remains mostly unexplored and unaddressed. This study explores the impact of high production volume LVP-VOCs on ozone formation from three cleaning products-associated activities (dishwashing, clothes washing, and surface cleaning). We develop a model framework to account for the portion available for ozone formation during the use phase and from the down-the-drain disposal. We apply experimental studies that measured emission rates or models that were developed for estimating emission rates of organic compounds during the use phase. Then, the fraction volatilized (fvolatilized) and the fraction disposed down the drain (fdown-the-drain) are multiplied by the portion available for ozone formation for releases to the outdoor air (fO3|volatilized) and down-the-drain (fO3|down-the-drain), respectively. Overall, for chemicals used in three specific cleaning-product uses, fvolatilized is less than 0.6% for all studied LVP-VOCs. Because greater than 99.4% of compounds are disposed of down the drain during the use phase, when combined with fO3|volatilized and fO3|down-the-drain, the portion available for ozone formation from the direct releases to outdoor air and the down-the-drain disposal is less than 0.4% and 0.2%, respectively. The results from this study indicate that the impact of the studied LVP-VOCs on ozone formation is very sensitive to what occurs during the use phase and suggest the need for future research on experimental work at the point of use.

KW - Cleaning product

KW - Consumer product

KW - Low vapor pressure-volatile organic compounds

KW - Ozone

KW - Volatilization model

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U2 - 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2016.02.131

DO - 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2016.02.131

M3 - Article

VL - 153

SP - 130

EP - 137

JO - Chemosphere

JF - Chemosphere

SN - 0045-6535

ER -