Vocal hoarseness and a subglottic mass: An uncommon diagnosis for a common complaint

Sassan Rafizadeh, Ken Y Yoneda, Amir Zeki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We report a patient with tracheopathia osteoplastica (TPO), a rare or perhaps underrecognized disorder, detected in approximately 1 in every 2000 to 5000 patients who undergo bronchoscopy. TPO is marked by proliferation of bony and cartilaginous spurs leading to airway stenosis. Multiple submucosal cartilaginous and osseous nodules can develop in the respiratory tract and may involve the entire trachea and mainstem bronchi. Symptoms may range from a completely silent condition to life-threatening respiratory failure and diagnosis is made based on radiological and bronchoscopic findings. Although the etiology has not been established, TPO can be familial and is sometimes associated with chronic inflammation, such as seen with rheumatic diseases. This case highlights the need for understanding TPO so that it can be differentiated from potentially serious conditions such as necrotizing granulomatous diseases, invasive infections, and cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Investigative Medicine High Impact Case Reports
Volume3
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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Hoarseness
complaint
Disease
etiology
proliferation
cancer
Bronchoscopy
Bronchi
Trachea
Rheumatic Diseases
Respiratory Insufficiency
Respiratory System
Pathologic Constriction
Inflammation
Tracheobronchopathia osteoplastica
Infection
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Airway stenosis
  • Hoarseness
  • Osteocartilaginous nodules
  • Trachea
  • Tracheopathia osteoplastica

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Safety Research

Cite this

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abstract = "We report a patient with tracheopathia osteoplastica (TPO), a rare or perhaps underrecognized disorder, detected in approximately 1 in every 2000 to 5000 patients who undergo bronchoscopy. TPO is marked by proliferation of bony and cartilaginous spurs leading to airway stenosis. Multiple submucosal cartilaginous and osseous nodules can develop in the respiratory tract and may involve the entire trachea and mainstem bronchi. Symptoms may range from a completely silent condition to life-threatening respiratory failure and diagnosis is made based on radiological and bronchoscopic findings. Although the etiology has not been established, TPO can be familial and is sometimes associated with chronic inflammation, such as seen with rheumatic diseases. This case highlights the need for understanding TPO so that it can be differentiated from potentially serious conditions such as necrotizing granulomatous diseases, invasive infections, and cancer.",
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N2 - We report a patient with tracheopathia osteoplastica (TPO), a rare or perhaps underrecognized disorder, detected in approximately 1 in every 2000 to 5000 patients who undergo bronchoscopy. TPO is marked by proliferation of bony and cartilaginous spurs leading to airway stenosis. Multiple submucosal cartilaginous and osseous nodules can develop in the respiratory tract and may involve the entire trachea and mainstem bronchi. Symptoms may range from a completely silent condition to life-threatening respiratory failure and diagnosis is made based on radiological and bronchoscopic findings. Although the etiology has not been established, TPO can be familial and is sometimes associated with chronic inflammation, such as seen with rheumatic diseases. This case highlights the need for understanding TPO so that it can be differentiated from potentially serious conditions such as necrotizing granulomatous diseases, invasive infections, and cancer.

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