Vitamin E and vitamin C supplement use and risk of incident Alzheimer disease

Martha Clare Morris, Laurel A Beckett, Paul A. Scherr, Liesi E. Hebert, David A. Bennett, Terry S. Field, Denis A. Evans

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

262 Scopus citations

Abstract

Oxidative stress may play a role in neurologic disease. The present study examined the relation between use of vitamin E and vitamin C and incident Alzheimer disease in a prospective study of 633 persons 65 years and older. A stratified random sample was selected from a disease-free population. At baseline, all vitamin supplements taken in the previous 2 weeks were identified by direct inspection. After an average follow-up period of 4.3 years, 91 of the sample participants with vitamin information met accepted criteria for the clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer disease. None of the 27 vitamin E supplement users had Alzheimer disease compared with 3.9 predicted based on the crude observed incidence among nonusers (p = 0.04) and 2.5 predicted based on age, sex, years of education, and length of follow-up interval (p = 0.23). None of the 23 vitamin C supplement users had Alzheimer disease compared with 3.3 predicted based on the crude observed incidence among nonusers (p = 0.10) and 3.2 predicted adjusted for age, sex, education, and follow-up interval (p = 0.04). There was no relation between Alzheimer disease and use of multivitamins. These data suggest that use of the higher-dose vitamin E and vitamin C supplements may lower the risk of Alzheimer disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)121-126
Number of pages6
JournalAlzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders
Volume12
Issue number3
StatePublished - Sep 1998
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Alzheimer disease
  • Antioxidants
  • Vitamins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Neuroscience(all)

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    Morris, M. C., Beckett, L. A., Scherr, P. A., Hebert, L. E., Bennett, D. A., Field, T. S., & Evans, D. A. (1998). Vitamin E and vitamin C supplement use and risk of incident Alzheimer disease. Alzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders, 12(3), 121-126.