Vitamin D and maternal and child health: Overview and implications for dietary requirements

Janet Y. Uriu-Adams, Sarah G. Obican, Carl L Keen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

The essentiality of vitamin D for normal growth and development has been recognized for over 80 years, and vitamin D fortification programs have been in place in the United States for more than 70 years. Despite the above, vitamin D deficiency continues to be a common finding in certain population groups. Vitamin D deficiency has been suggested as a potential risk factor for the development of preeclampsia, and vitamin D deficiency during infancy and early childhood is associated with an increased risk for numerous skeletal disorders, as well as immunological and vascular abnormalities. Vitamin D deficiency can occur through multiple mechanisms including the consumption of diets low in this vitamin and inadequate exposure to environmental ultraviolet B rays. The potential value of vitamin D supplementation in high-risk pregnancies and during infancy and early childhood is discussed. Currently, there is vigorous debate concerning what constitutes appropriate vitamin D intakes during early development as exemplified by differing recommendations from the Institute of Medicine Dietary Reference Intake report and recent recommendations by the Endocrine Society. As is discussed, a major issue that needs to be resolved is what key biological endpoint should be used when making vitamin D recommendations for the pregnant woman and her offspring.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)24-44
Number of pages21
JournalBirth Defects Research Part C - Embryo Today: Reviews
Volume99
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2013

Keywords

  • Preeclampsia
  • Pregnancy
  • Rickets
  • Vitamin D
  • Vitamin D deficiency
  • Vitamin D toxicity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Embryology
  • Developmental Biology

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