Vitamin D and calcium intake in relation to risk of endometrial cancer

A systematic review of the literature

Marjorie L. McCullough, Elisa V. Bandera, Dirk F. Moore, Lawrence H. Kushi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: In response to a recent ecologic study of UV exposure and endometrial cancer incidence, we present the epidemiologic evidence on the relation between intake of vitamin D and its metabolically related nutrient, calcium, and the occurrence of endometrial cancer. Methods: We conducted a systematic literature review and meta-analysis of vitamin D and calcium in relation to endometrial cancer, including peer-reviewed manuscripts published up to May 2007. Random and fixed effects summary estimates were computed. Results: Pooled analyses of the three case-control studies of dietary vitamin D and endometrial cancer uncovered heterogeneous results that were not significant in random or fixed effects analyses. Cut-points for the highest vitamin D intakes ranged from > 244 to > 476 IU/day. Qualitatively similar findings were observed for dietary calcium. Only two studies provided estimates for calcium supplements (random effects OR = 0.62, 95% CI 0.39-0.99; fixed effects OR = 0.62, 95% CI 0.42-0.93, for top vs. bottom category, p for heterogeneity = 0.25). Conclusions: The limited epidemiological evidence suggests no relation between endometrial cancer in the ranges of dietary vitamin D examined, and suggests a possible inverse association for calcium from supplements. Prospective studies, ideally including plasma 25(OH) D to estimate vitamin D input from diet and sun exposure, are needed to further explore these hypotheses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)298-302
Number of pages5
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume46
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Endometrial Neoplasms
Vitamin D
Calcium
Dietary Calcium
Manuscripts
Solar System
Meta-Analysis
Case-Control Studies
Prospective Studies
Diet
Food
Incidence

Keywords

  • Calcium
  • Diet
  • Dietary
  • Dietary supplements
  • Endometrial neoplasms
  • Vitamin D

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Vitamin D and calcium intake in relation to risk of endometrial cancer : A systematic review of the literature. / McCullough, Marjorie L.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Moore, Dirk F.; Kushi, Lawrence H.

In: Preventive Medicine, Vol. 46, No. 4, 04.2008, p. 298-302.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McCullough, Marjorie L. ; Bandera, Elisa V. ; Moore, Dirk F. ; Kushi, Lawrence H. / Vitamin D and calcium intake in relation to risk of endometrial cancer : A systematic review of the literature. In: Preventive Medicine. 2008 ; Vol. 46, No. 4. pp. 298-302.
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