Vitamin A deficiency diminishes the salivary immunoglobulin A response and enhances the serum immunoglobulin G response to influenza A virus infection in BALB/c mice

Charles B. Stephensen, Zina Moldoveanu, Nupur N. Gangopadhyay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examined the effect of vitamin A deficiency on the secretory immunoglobulin (Ig) A and serum IgG response to influenza A virus infections in BALB/c mice. Mice fed a vitamin A-deficient (VAD mice) or a control diet were inoculated with influenza virus at 7 or 9 wk of age when serum retinol concentration had dropped to ≤0.35 μmol/L in the VAD mice. The influenza- specific salivary IgA response to a mild infection (intranasal inoculation without anesthesia) was not significantly lower in the VAD group (5.3 ± 2.1% of total IgA 4 wk after infection) than in the control group (10 ± 11%, P > 0.05). In a separate experiment, this salivary IgA response was significantly lower in the VAD mice (0.3 ± 0.4% of total IgA) following a more severe infection (intranasal infection while under anesthesia) than it was in control mice (4.2 ± 4.6% of total IgA, P < 0.0001). In contrast, the concentration of total salivary IgA was uniformly greater in the VAD mice than in the control mice during both the mild infection (VAD, 17 ± 6 mg/L vs. control, 8 ± 11 mg/L at 3 wk, P < 0.0001) and the severe infection (VAD, 38 ± 30 mg/L vs. control, 9 ± 7 mg/L, P < 0.0001). Similarly, the influenza-specific serum IgG response was also greater in the VAD mice than in the control mice during both the mild infection (VAD, 194 ± 91 mg/L vs. control, 79 ± 95 mg/L at 5 wk, P = 0.0002) and the severe infection [VAD median, 202 mg/L (25th, 75th percentiles, 153, 409 mg/L) vs. control, 123 mg/L (42, 165 mg/L), P = 0.0023]. Thus VAD significantly impairs the secretory IgA response to influenza infection but modestly increases the serum IgG response to the same infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)94-102
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume126
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Vitamin A Deficiency
immunoglobulin A
vitamin A deficiency
immunoglobulin G
Influenza A virus
Virus Diseases
Immunoglobulin A
Immunoglobulin G
mice
Serum
infection
Infection
influenza
Human Influenza
Secretory Immunoglobulin A
Vitamin A
vitamin A
anesthesia
Anesthesia
Orthomyxoviridae

Keywords

  • IgA
  • IgG
  • influenza
  • mice
  • vitamin A

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

Vitamin A deficiency diminishes the salivary immunoglobulin A response and enhances the serum immunoglobulin G response to influenza A virus infection in BALB/c mice. / Stephensen, Charles B.; Moldoveanu, Zina; Gangopadhyay, Nupur N.

In: Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 126, No. 1, 01.1996, p. 94-102.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "We examined the effect of vitamin A deficiency on the secretory immunoglobulin (Ig) A and serum IgG response to influenza A virus infections in BALB/c mice. Mice fed a vitamin A-deficient (VAD mice) or a control diet were inoculated with influenza virus at 7 or 9 wk of age when serum retinol concentration had dropped to ≤0.35 μmol/L in the VAD mice. The influenza- specific salivary IgA response to a mild infection (intranasal inoculation without anesthesia) was not significantly lower in the VAD group (5.3 ± 2.1{\%} of total IgA 4 wk after infection) than in the control group (10 ± 11{\%}, P > 0.05). In a separate experiment, this salivary IgA response was significantly lower in the VAD mice (0.3 ± 0.4{\%} of total IgA) following a more severe infection (intranasal infection while under anesthesia) than it was in control mice (4.2 ± 4.6{\%} of total IgA, P < 0.0001). In contrast, the concentration of total salivary IgA was uniformly greater in the VAD mice than in the control mice during both the mild infection (VAD, 17 ± 6 mg/L vs. control, 8 ± 11 mg/L at 3 wk, P < 0.0001) and the severe infection (VAD, 38 ± 30 mg/L vs. control, 9 ± 7 mg/L, P < 0.0001). Similarly, the influenza-specific serum IgG response was also greater in the VAD mice than in the control mice during both the mild infection (VAD, 194 ± 91 mg/L vs. control, 79 ± 95 mg/L at 5 wk, P = 0.0002) and the severe infection [VAD median, 202 mg/L (25th, 75th percentiles, 153, 409 mg/L) vs. control, 123 mg/L (42, 165 mg/L), P = 0.0023]. Thus VAD significantly impairs the secretory IgA response to influenza infection but modestly increases the serum IgG response to the same infection.",
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