Vital pulp therapy in dogs: 190 cases (2001-2011)

Niina Luotonen, Helena Kuntsi-Vaattovaara, Eva Sarkiala-Kessel, Jouni J T Junnila, Outi Laitinen-Vapaavuori, Frank J Verstraete

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective-To evaluate factors associated with the outcome of vital pulp therapy (VPT) in dogs. Design-Retrospective study. Sample-190 teeth in 138 dogs. Procedures-Medical records were reviewed; radiographs obtained before, immediately after, and during the last available follow-up examination for VPT were evaluated. Treatment was categorized as successful (with radiographic evidence of continued secondary dentin production, continued root formation in immature teeth, and absence of clinical and radio-graphic signs of apical periodontitis and internal or external inflammatory root resorption), having no evidence of failure (with signs for success fulfilled except the width of the apical periodontal ligament space, which could be wider than but no more than double the width of the periodontal ligament space in other areas), or failed (with radiographic evidence of pulp necrosis, apical periodontitis, or inflammatory root resorption). Associations between diagnostic or treatment-related variables and outcome were assessed with multinomial logistic regression. Results-Overall, treatment was classified as successful for 162 of 190 (85%) teeth, including 23 (12%) teeth with no evidence of failure, and as having failed for 28 (15%) teeth. The overall success rate was 137 of 149 (92%) for teeth treated with mineral trioxide aggregate alone and 21 of 36 (58%) for teeth treated with Ca(OH)2 alone. Use of Ca(OH)2 and deep penetration of dressing material into the vital pulp were each significantly associated with increased odds of treatment failure. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Results indicated that VPT with mineral trioxide aggregate was an effective option for use in crown reduction to treat malocclusion and for treatment of recent crown fractures in immature or mature permanent teeth.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)449-459
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume244
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 15 2014

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therapy dogs
pulp
Tooth
teeth
Dogs
Periapical Periodontitis
Root Resorption
Periodontal Ligament
Therapeutics
Crowns
resorption
ligaments
Secondary Dentin
Dental Pulp Necrosis
immatures
minerals
Malocclusion
therapeutics
Bandages
Treatment Failure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Luotonen, N., Kuntsi-Vaattovaara, H., Sarkiala-Kessel, E., Junnila, J. J. T., Laitinen-Vapaavuori, O., & Verstraete, F. J. (2014). Vital pulp therapy in dogs: 190 cases (2001-2011). Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 244(4), 449-459. https://doi.org/10.2460/javma.244.4.449

Vital pulp therapy in dogs : 190 cases (2001-2011). / Luotonen, Niina; Kuntsi-Vaattovaara, Helena; Sarkiala-Kessel, Eva; Junnila, Jouni J T; Laitinen-Vapaavuori, Outi; Verstraete, Frank J.

In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Vol. 244, No. 4, 15.02.2014, p. 449-459.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Luotonen, N, Kuntsi-Vaattovaara, H, Sarkiala-Kessel, E, Junnila, JJT, Laitinen-Vapaavuori, O & Verstraete, FJ 2014, 'Vital pulp therapy in dogs: 190 cases (2001-2011)', Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, vol. 244, no. 4, pp. 449-459. https://doi.org/10.2460/javma.244.4.449
Luotonen N, Kuntsi-Vaattovaara H, Sarkiala-Kessel E, Junnila JJT, Laitinen-Vapaavuori O, Verstraete FJ. Vital pulp therapy in dogs: 190 cases (2001-2011). Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. 2014 Feb 15;244(4):449-459. https://doi.org/10.2460/javma.244.4.449
Luotonen, Niina ; Kuntsi-Vaattovaara, Helena ; Sarkiala-Kessel, Eva ; Junnila, Jouni J T ; Laitinen-Vapaavuori, Outi ; Verstraete, Frank J. / Vital pulp therapy in dogs : 190 cases (2001-2011). In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. 2014 ; Vol. 244, No. 4. pp. 449-459.
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abstract = "Objective-To evaluate factors associated with the outcome of vital pulp therapy (VPT) in dogs. Design-Retrospective study. Sample-190 teeth in 138 dogs. Procedures-Medical records were reviewed; radiographs obtained before, immediately after, and during the last available follow-up examination for VPT were evaluated. Treatment was categorized as successful (with radiographic evidence of continued secondary dentin production, continued root formation in immature teeth, and absence of clinical and radio-graphic signs of apical periodontitis and internal or external inflammatory root resorption), having no evidence of failure (with signs for success fulfilled except the width of the apical periodontal ligament space, which could be wider than but no more than double the width of the periodontal ligament space in other areas), or failed (with radiographic evidence of pulp necrosis, apical periodontitis, or inflammatory root resorption). Associations between diagnostic or treatment-related variables and outcome were assessed with multinomial logistic regression. Results-Overall, treatment was classified as successful for 162 of 190 (85{\%}) teeth, including 23 (12{\%}) teeth with no evidence of failure, and as having failed for 28 (15{\%}) teeth. The overall success rate was 137 of 149 (92{\%}) for teeth treated with mineral trioxide aggregate alone and 21 of 36 (58{\%}) for teeth treated with Ca(OH)2 alone. Use of Ca(OH)2 and deep penetration of dressing material into the vital pulp were each significantly associated with increased odds of treatment failure. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Results indicated that VPT with mineral trioxide aggregate was an effective option for use in crown reduction to treat malocclusion and for treatment of recent crown fractures in immature or mature permanent teeth.",
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