Visualization of fast-moving cells in vivo using digital holographic video microscopy

Hongyue Sun, Bing Song, Hongpai Dong, Brian Reid, Michael A. Player, John Watson, Min Zhao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Digital in-line holography offers some significant advantages over conventional optical holography and microscopy to image biological specimens. By combining holography with digital video microscopy, an in-line holographic video microscope is developed and is capable of recording spatial 3D holographic images of biological specimens, while preserving the time dimension. The system enables high-speed video recording of fast cell movement, such as the rapid movement of blood cells in the blood stream in vivo. This capability is demonstrated with observations of fast 3-D movement of live cells in suspension cultures in response to a gentle shake to the Petri dish. The experimental and numerical procedures are incorporated with a fast reconstruction algorithm for reconstruction of holographic video frames at various planes (z axis) from the hologram and along the time axis. The current system enables both lateral and longitudinal resolutions down to a few micrometers. Postreconstruction processing of background subtraction is utilized to eliminate noise caused by scattered light, thereby enabling visualization of, for example, blood streams of live Xenopos tadpoles. The combination of digital holography and microscopy offers unique advantages for imaging of fast moving cells and other biological particles in three dimensions in vivo with high spatial and temporal resolution.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number014007
JournalJournal of Biomedical Optics
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008

Fingerprint

Holography
Video Microscopy
holography
Microscopic examination
Visualization
microscopy
Blood
cells
blood
Cell Movement
Microscopy
recording
Cells
Video recording
Video Recording
blood cells
parabolic reflectors
Holograms
temporal resolution
subtraction

Keywords

  • biomedical optics
  • cells
  • digital imaging
  • holography applications
  • microscopy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Biomaterials
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
  • Clinical Biochemistry

Cite this

Visualization of fast-moving cells in vivo using digital holographic video microscopy. / Sun, Hongyue; Song, Bing; Dong, Hongpai; Reid, Brian; Player, Michael A.; Watson, John; Zhao, Min.

In: Journal of Biomedical Optics, Vol. 13, No. 1, 014007, 2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sun, Hongyue ; Song, Bing ; Dong, Hongpai ; Reid, Brian ; Player, Michael A. ; Watson, John ; Zhao, Min. / Visualization of fast-moving cells in vivo using digital holographic video microscopy. In: Journal of Biomedical Optics. 2008 ; Vol. 13, No. 1.
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