Viremia and serological responses in adult chickens infected with western equine encephalomyelitis and St. Louis encephalitis viruses.

William Reisen, S. B. Presser, J. Lin, B. Enge, J. L. Hardy, R. W. Emmons

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Adult hens, similar to those used for arbovirus surveillance, were experimentally infected with western equine encephalomyelitis (WEE) and St. Louis encephalitis (SLE) viruses to describe the viremia response, to compare serological testing methods, and to evaluate a new method of collecting whole blood onto filter paper strips from lancet pricks of the chicken comb. Young (19 weeks), but not old (38 weeks), hens developed a low-titer, transient viremia for a 1-day period. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) was detected by days 10 and 14 after infection with WEE and SLE viruses, respectively, by indirect fluorescent antibody tests, hemagglutination inhibition tests, and plaque reduction neutralization tests on sera and in direct enzyme immunoassays (EIA) on both sera and eluates from filter paper samples. Immunoglobulin M (IgM) was first detected in sera 2 and 3 days before IgG, respectively, but IgM could not be detected reliably in eluates from dried blood. Sera and dried blood samples collected from naturally infected sentinel chickens gave comparable results when tested by an EIA for IgG.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)549-555
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Mosquito Control Association
Volume10
Issue number4
StatePublished - Dec 1 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Western Equine Encephalomyelitis
Western equine encephalomyelitis
St. Louis Encephalitis Viruses
Saint Louis encephalitis virus
encephalitis
Viremia
viremia
blood serum
serum
Chickens
immunoglobulin G
virus
chickens
immunoglobulin M
Immunoglobulin G
blood
immunoassay
enzyme immunoassays
Serum
Immunoenzyme Techniques

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Insect Science

Cite this

Viremia and serological responses in adult chickens infected with western equine encephalomyelitis and St. Louis encephalitis viruses. / Reisen, William; Presser, S. B.; Lin, J.; Enge, B.; Hardy, J. L.; Emmons, R. W.

In: Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association, Vol. 10, No. 4, 01.12.1994, p. 549-555.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{caf643eb53a2447dbdf8154c13997049,
title = "Viremia and serological responses in adult chickens infected with western equine encephalomyelitis and St. Louis encephalitis viruses.",
abstract = "Adult hens, similar to those used for arbovirus surveillance, were experimentally infected with western equine encephalomyelitis (WEE) and St. Louis encephalitis (SLE) viruses to describe the viremia response, to compare serological testing methods, and to evaluate a new method of collecting whole blood onto filter paper strips from lancet pricks of the chicken comb. Young (19 weeks), but not old (38 weeks), hens developed a low-titer, transient viremia for a 1-day period. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) was detected by days 10 and 14 after infection with WEE and SLE viruses, respectively, by indirect fluorescent antibody tests, hemagglutination inhibition tests, and plaque reduction neutralization tests on sera and in direct enzyme immunoassays (EIA) on both sera and eluates from filter paper samples. Immunoglobulin M (IgM) was first detected in sera 2 and 3 days before IgG, respectively, but IgM could not be detected reliably in eluates from dried blood. Sera and dried blood samples collected from naturally infected sentinel chickens gave comparable results when tested by an EIA for IgG.",
author = "William Reisen and Presser, {S. B.} and J. Lin and B. Enge and Hardy, {J. L.} and Emmons, {R. W.}",
year = "1994",
month = "12",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "10",
pages = "549--555",
journal = "Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association",
issn = "8756-971X",
publisher = "American Mosquito Control Association",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Viremia and serological responses in adult chickens infected with western equine encephalomyelitis and St. Louis encephalitis viruses.

AU - Reisen, William

AU - Presser, S. B.

AU - Lin, J.

AU - Enge, B.

AU - Hardy, J. L.

AU - Emmons, R. W.

PY - 1994/12/1

Y1 - 1994/12/1

N2 - Adult hens, similar to those used for arbovirus surveillance, were experimentally infected with western equine encephalomyelitis (WEE) and St. Louis encephalitis (SLE) viruses to describe the viremia response, to compare serological testing methods, and to evaluate a new method of collecting whole blood onto filter paper strips from lancet pricks of the chicken comb. Young (19 weeks), but not old (38 weeks), hens developed a low-titer, transient viremia for a 1-day period. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) was detected by days 10 and 14 after infection with WEE and SLE viruses, respectively, by indirect fluorescent antibody tests, hemagglutination inhibition tests, and plaque reduction neutralization tests on sera and in direct enzyme immunoassays (EIA) on both sera and eluates from filter paper samples. Immunoglobulin M (IgM) was first detected in sera 2 and 3 days before IgG, respectively, but IgM could not be detected reliably in eluates from dried blood. Sera and dried blood samples collected from naturally infected sentinel chickens gave comparable results when tested by an EIA for IgG.

AB - Adult hens, similar to those used for arbovirus surveillance, were experimentally infected with western equine encephalomyelitis (WEE) and St. Louis encephalitis (SLE) viruses to describe the viremia response, to compare serological testing methods, and to evaluate a new method of collecting whole blood onto filter paper strips from lancet pricks of the chicken comb. Young (19 weeks), but not old (38 weeks), hens developed a low-titer, transient viremia for a 1-day period. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) was detected by days 10 and 14 after infection with WEE and SLE viruses, respectively, by indirect fluorescent antibody tests, hemagglutination inhibition tests, and plaque reduction neutralization tests on sera and in direct enzyme immunoassays (EIA) on both sera and eluates from filter paper samples. Immunoglobulin M (IgM) was first detected in sera 2 and 3 days before IgG, respectively, but IgM could not be detected reliably in eluates from dried blood. Sera and dried blood samples collected from naturally infected sentinel chickens gave comparable results when tested by an EIA for IgG.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028708420&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0028708420&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 7707063

AN - SCOPUS:0028708420

VL - 10

SP - 549

EP - 555

JO - Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association

JF - Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association

SN - 8756-971X

IS - 4

ER -