Video-assisted thoracic surgery for the management of pyothorax in dogs: 14 cases

Jacqueline Scott, Ameet Singh, Eric Monnet, Kristin A. Coleman, Jeffrey J. Runge, Joseph Brad Case, Philipp Mayhew

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objective: To report the perioperative findings and outcome of dogs undergoing video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) for the management of pyothorax. Design: Multi-institutional, retrospective study. Animals: Client-owned dogs (n=14). Methods: Medical records of dogs with pyothorax managed via VATS were reviewed for signalment, history, clinical signs, clinicopathological findings, diagnostic imaging results, surgical variables, bacterial culture and sensitivity results, post-operative management and outcome. VATS was performed after placing a paraxyphoid endoscopic portal and 2-3 intercostal instrument portals. VATS exploration was followed by one or more of the following: mediastinal debridement, tissue sampling, pleural lavage, and placement of a thoracostomy tube. Results: Two dogs (14%) required conversion from VATS to an open thoracotomy to completely resect proliferative mediastinal tissue. These dogs had severe pleural effusion on preoperative thoracic radiographs and one had severely thickened contrast-enhancing mediastinum on preoperative computed tomography (CT). The cause of pyothorax was identified as a penetrating gastric foreign body (n=2), migrating plant material (n=2), and idiopathic (n=10). The median follow-up time was 143 days (range, 14-2402 days). All dogs were discharged from the hospital and their clinical signs resolved. One patient had recurrence of a pyothorax requiring revision surgery 17 months postoperatively. Conclusion: VATS allows minimally invasive treatment of uncomplicated canine pyothorax. Preoperative thoracic CT may help identify candidates for VATS among dogs with pyothorax.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalVeterinary Surgery
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2017

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thoracoscopy
Pleural Empyema
Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgery
Dogs
dogs
chest
computed tomography
Thorax
Tomography
Thoracostomy
mediastinum
debridement
Therapeutic Irrigation
Mediastinum
Debridement
Pleural Effusion
Diagnostic Imaging
Thoracotomy
Foreign Bodies
foreign bodies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Scott, J., Singh, A., Monnet, E., Coleman, K. A., Runge, J. J., Case, J. B., & Mayhew, P. (Accepted/In press). Video-assisted thoracic surgery for the management of pyothorax in dogs: 14 cases. Veterinary Surgery. https://doi.org/10.1111/vsu.12661

Video-assisted thoracic surgery for the management of pyothorax in dogs : 14 cases. / Scott, Jacqueline; Singh, Ameet; Monnet, Eric; Coleman, Kristin A.; Runge, Jeffrey J.; Case, Joseph Brad; Mayhew, Philipp.

In: Veterinary Surgery, 2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Scott, Jacqueline ; Singh, Ameet ; Monnet, Eric ; Coleman, Kristin A. ; Runge, Jeffrey J. ; Case, Joseph Brad ; Mayhew, Philipp. / Video-assisted thoracic surgery for the management of pyothorax in dogs : 14 cases. In: Veterinary Surgery. 2017.
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