Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus transmission and effect on pathogenesis

Darci R. Smith, Patricia V. Aguilar, Lark L Schneider, Gregory D. Gromowski, Eryu Wang, Scott C. Weaver

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

Quantifying the dose of an arbovirus transmitted by mosquitoes is essential for designing pathogenesis studies simulating natural infection of vertebrates. Titration of saliva collected in vitro from infected mosquitoes may not accurately estimate titers transmitted during blood feeding, and infection by needle injection may affect vertebrate pathogenesis. We compared the amount of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus collected from the saliva of Aedes taeniorhynchus to the amount injected into a mouse during blood feeding. Less virus was transmitted by mosquitoes in vivo (geometric mean 11 PFU) than was found for comparable times of salivation in vitro (mean saliva titer 74 PFU). We also observed slightly lower early and late viremia titers in mice that were needle injected with 8 PFU, which represents the low end of the in vivo transmission range. No differences in survival were detected, regardless of the dose or infection route.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1190-1196
Number of pages7
JournalEmerging Infectious Diseases
Volume12
Issue number8
StatePublished - 2006
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Epidemiology

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  • Cite this

    Smith, D. R., Aguilar, P. V., Schneider, L. L., Gromowski, G. D., Wang, E., & Weaver, S. C. (2006). Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus transmission and effect on pathogenesis. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1190-1196.