Venereal diseases of cattle: Natural history, diagnosis, and the role of vaccines in their control

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

67 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

With the large majority of beef cattle and increasing numbers of dairy cattle in North America bred by natural service, venereal disease is still prevalent. Several agents can be transmitted by coitus, but the classical two are still Campylobacter fetus venerealis and Tritrichomonas foetus. Their epidemiology is essentially identical, and indeed much of the pathophysiology is very similar, so the two should be considered simultaneously in most diagnostic situations. In this article, means of diagnosis, treatment (where appropriate) and prevention are discussed at both the individual and herd level. A brief mention is made of other potential venereal agents including Haemophilus somnus, Ureaplasm diversum, and Leptospira borgpetersenii.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)383-408
Number of pages26
JournalVeterinary Clinics of North America - Food Animal Practice
Volume21
Issue number2 SPEC. ISS.
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2005

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Leptospira borgpetersenii
Haemophilus somnus
Tritrichomonas foetus
Campylobacter fetus
sexually transmitted diseases
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
pathophysiology
Natural History
natural history
beef cattle
dairy cattle
epidemiology
Vaccines
herds
vaccines
breeds
Leptospira
Coitus
cattle
North America

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Animals

Cite this

Venereal diseases of cattle : Natural history, diagnosis, and the role of vaccines in their control. / Bondurant, Robert.

In: Veterinary Clinics of North America - Food Animal Practice, Vol. 21, No. 2 SPEC. ISS., 01.07.2005, p. 383-408.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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