Value of partial ejection fraction, volume increment, and regional wall motion in identifying patients with clinically significant coronary artery disease

F. H. Sheehan, H. T. Dodge, E. L. Bolson, H. W. Woo, Gary R Caputo, D. K. Stewart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent studies suggest that the partial ejection fraction (EF) in early systole is a more sensitive index of left ventricular (LV) dysfunction than the holosystolic EF. The authors examined LV volume, partial EF, and volume increment at each of 12 time points in systole to determine which parameter best distinguishes normal subjects from patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Contrast ventriculograms, obtained either in the right anterior oblique projection (60 frames/sec) or in the biplane projection (30 frames/sec), of 58 normal subjects and 68 patients with CAD were studied. The endocardial contour in each frame of a sinus beat was traced to derive a volume curve. At each twelfth of systole, LV volume was extrapolated from the curve and the partial EF was calculated. The increment in volume between successive time points was also calculated. Both partial EF and LV volume in patients with CAD became progressively more abnormal with time; peak abnormality occurred at end-systole. In a subgroup of patients with CAD who had normal holosystolic EF, both partial EF and volume were normal throughout systole. The increment in volume with each twelfth of systole in patients with CAD deviated less than 1 SD from normal throughout systole. Thus, maximum abnormality in partial EF and volume occurs at end-systole. Of the parameters of global LV function tested, holosystolic EF best distinguishes patients with CAD from normal subjects. However, regional wall motion measured in the area of interest is more sensitive to localized abnormality, the severity of which may be overestimated or underestimated by the EF due to hyperkinesis or hypokinesis in other regions of the left ventricle.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)756-762
Number of pages7
JournalCirculation
Volume68
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1983
Externally publishedYes

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Systole
Coronary Artery Disease
Hyperkinesis
Left Ventricular Dysfunction
Left Ventricular Function
Stroke Volume
Heart Ventricles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Value of partial ejection fraction, volume increment, and regional wall motion in identifying patients with clinically significant coronary artery disease. / Sheehan, F. H.; Dodge, H. T.; Bolson, E. L.; Woo, H. W.; Caputo, Gary R; Stewart, D. K.

In: Circulation, Vol. 68, No. 4, 1983, p. 756-762.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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