Value of Global Surgical Activities for US Academic Health Centers: A Position Paper by the Association for Academic Surgery Global Affairs Committee, Society of University Surgeons Committee on Global Academic Surgery, and American College of Surgeons’ Operation Giving Back

Academic Global Surgery Taskforce

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Academic global surgery value to low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) is increasingly understood, yet value to academic health centers (AHCs) remains unclear. Study Design: A task force from the Association for Academic Surgery Global Affairs Committee and the Society for University Surgeons Committee on Global Academic Surgery designed and disseminated a survey to active US academic global surgeons. Questions included participant characteristics, global surgeon qualifications, trainee interactions, academic output, productivity challenges, and career models. The task force used the survey results to create a position paper outlining the value of academic global surgeons to AHCs. Results: The survey had a 58% (n = 36) response rate. An academic global surgeon has a US medical school appointment, spends dedicated time in an LMIC, spends vacation time doing mission work, or works primarily in an LMIC. Most spend 1 to 3 months abroad annually, dedicating <25% effort to global surgery, including systems building, teaching, research, and clinical care. Most are university-employed and 65% report compensation is equivalent or greater than colleagues. Academic support includes administrative, protected time, funding. Most institutions do not use specific global surgery metrics to measure productivity. Barriers include funding, clinical responsibilities, and salary support. Conclusions: Academic global surgeons spend a modest amount of time abroad, require minimal financial support, and represent a low-cost investment in an under-recognized scholarship area. This position paper suggests measures of global surgery that could provide opportunities for AHCs and surgical departments to expand missions of service, education, and research and enhance institutional reputation while achieving societal impact.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)455-466.e6
JournalJournal of the American College of Surgeons
Volume227
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2018

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Health
Advisory Committees
Financial Support
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
Medical Schools
Research
Compensation and Redress
Surgeons
Appointments and Schedules
Teaching
Education
Costs and Cost Analysis
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

@article{49ea2dc120a14d98921ffae095b4e213,
title = "Value of Global Surgical Activities for US Academic Health Centers: A Position Paper by the Association for Academic Surgery Global Affairs Committee, Society of University Surgeons Committee on Global Academic Surgery, and American College of Surgeons’ Operation Giving Back",
abstract = "Background: Academic global surgery value to low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) is increasingly understood, yet value to academic health centers (AHCs) remains unclear. Study Design: A task force from the Association for Academic Surgery Global Affairs Committee and the Society for University Surgeons Committee on Global Academic Surgery designed and disseminated a survey to active US academic global surgeons. Questions included participant characteristics, global surgeon qualifications, trainee interactions, academic output, productivity challenges, and career models. The task force used the survey results to create a position paper outlining the value of academic global surgeons to AHCs. Results: The survey had a 58{\%} (n = 36) response rate. An academic global surgeon has a US medical school appointment, spends dedicated time in an LMIC, spends vacation time doing mission work, or works primarily in an LMIC. Most spend 1 to 3 months abroad annually, dedicating <25{\%} effort to global surgery, including systems building, teaching, research, and clinical care. Most are university-employed and 65{\%} report compensation is equivalent or greater than colleagues. Academic support includes administrative, protected time, funding. Most institutions do not use specific global surgery metrics to measure productivity. Barriers include funding, clinical responsibilities, and salary support. Conclusions: Academic global surgeons spend a modest amount of time abroad, require minimal financial support, and represent a low-cost investment in an under-recognized scholarship area. This position paper suggests measures of global surgery that could provide opportunities for AHCs and surgical departments to expand missions of service, education, and research and enhance institutional reputation while achieving societal impact.",
author = "{Academic Global Surgery Taskforce} and Jennifer Rickard and Ekene Onwuka and Saju Joseph and Doruk Ozgediz and Sanjay Krishnaswami and Oyetunji, {Tolulope A.} and Jyotirmay Sharma and Ginwalla, {Rashna Farhad} and Nwomeh, {Benedict C.} and Sudha Jayaraman and Aboutanos, {Michel A.} and Bickler, {Steven W.} and Calland, {James F.} and Caty, {Michael G.} and Anthony Charles and DeUgarte, {Daniel A.} and Rochelle Dicker and Farmer, {Diana L} and Lorena Gonzalez and Adil Haider and Catherine Juillard and David Lanning and Rifat Latifi and Nwariaku, {Fiemu E.} and Pawlik, {Timothy M.} and Peck, {Gregory L.} and Raymond Price and Puyana, {Juan Carlos} and Remick, {Kyle N.} and Robert Riviello and Rodas, {Edgar B.} and Rogers, {Selwyn O.} and Shrime, {Mark G.} and Wolfgang Stehr and Mamta Swaroop and Tarpley, {John L.} and Girma Tefera and Dinesh Vyas and Weiser, {Thomas G.} and Wren, {Sherry M.}",
year = "2018",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jamcollsurg.2018.07.661",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "227",
pages = "455--466.e6",
journal = "Journal of the American College of Surgeons",
issn = "1072-7515",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "4",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Value of Global Surgical Activities for US Academic Health Centers

T2 - A Position Paper by the Association for Academic Surgery Global Affairs Committee, Society of University Surgeons Committee on Global Academic Surgery, and American College of Surgeons’ Operation Giving Back

AU - Academic Global Surgery Taskforce

AU - Rickard, Jennifer

AU - Onwuka, Ekene

AU - Joseph, Saju

AU - Ozgediz, Doruk

AU - Krishnaswami, Sanjay

AU - Oyetunji, Tolulope A.

AU - Sharma, Jyotirmay

AU - Ginwalla, Rashna Farhad

AU - Nwomeh, Benedict C.

AU - Jayaraman, Sudha

AU - Aboutanos, Michel A.

AU - Bickler, Steven W.

AU - Calland, James F.

AU - Caty, Michael G.

AU - Charles, Anthony

AU - DeUgarte, Daniel A.

AU - Dicker, Rochelle

AU - Farmer, Diana L

AU - Gonzalez, Lorena

AU - Haider, Adil

AU - Juillard, Catherine

AU - Lanning, David

AU - Latifi, Rifat

AU - Nwariaku, Fiemu E.

AU - Pawlik, Timothy M.

AU - Peck, Gregory L.

AU - Price, Raymond

AU - Puyana, Juan Carlos

AU - Remick, Kyle N.

AU - Riviello, Robert

AU - Rodas, Edgar B.

AU - Rogers, Selwyn O.

AU - Shrime, Mark G.

AU - Stehr, Wolfgang

AU - Swaroop, Mamta

AU - Tarpley, John L.

AU - Tefera, Girma

AU - Vyas, Dinesh

AU - Weiser, Thomas G.

AU - Wren, Sherry M.

PY - 2018/10/1

Y1 - 2018/10/1

N2 - Background: Academic global surgery value to low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) is increasingly understood, yet value to academic health centers (AHCs) remains unclear. Study Design: A task force from the Association for Academic Surgery Global Affairs Committee and the Society for University Surgeons Committee on Global Academic Surgery designed and disseminated a survey to active US academic global surgeons. Questions included participant characteristics, global surgeon qualifications, trainee interactions, academic output, productivity challenges, and career models. The task force used the survey results to create a position paper outlining the value of academic global surgeons to AHCs. Results: The survey had a 58% (n = 36) response rate. An academic global surgeon has a US medical school appointment, spends dedicated time in an LMIC, spends vacation time doing mission work, or works primarily in an LMIC. Most spend 1 to 3 months abroad annually, dedicating <25% effort to global surgery, including systems building, teaching, research, and clinical care. Most are university-employed and 65% report compensation is equivalent or greater than colleagues. Academic support includes administrative, protected time, funding. Most institutions do not use specific global surgery metrics to measure productivity. Barriers include funding, clinical responsibilities, and salary support. Conclusions: Academic global surgeons spend a modest amount of time abroad, require minimal financial support, and represent a low-cost investment in an under-recognized scholarship area. This position paper suggests measures of global surgery that could provide opportunities for AHCs and surgical departments to expand missions of service, education, and research and enhance institutional reputation while achieving societal impact.

AB - Background: Academic global surgery value to low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) is increasingly understood, yet value to academic health centers (AHCs) remains unclear. Study Design: A task force from the Association for Academic Surgery Global Affairs Committee and the Society for University Surgeons Committee on Global Academic Surgery designed and disseminated a survey to active US academic global surgeons. Questions included participant characteristics, global surgeon qualifications, trainee interactions, academic output, productivity challenges, and career models. The task force used the survey results to create a position paper outlining the value of academic global surgeons to AHCs. Results: The survey had a 58% (n = 36) response rate. An academic global surgeon has a US medical school appointment, spends dedicated time in an LMIC, spends vacation time doing mission work, or works primarily in an LMIC. Most spend 1 to 3 months abroad annually, dedicating <25% effort to global surgery, including systems building, teaching, research, and clinical care. Most are university-employed and 65% report compensation is equivalent or greater than colleagues. Academic support includes administrative, protected time, funding. Most institutions do not use specific global surgery metrics to measure productivity. Barriers include funding, clinical responsibilities, and salary support. Conclusions: Academic global surgeons spend a modest amount of time abroad, require minimal financial support, and represent a low-cost investment in an under-recognized scholarship area. This position paper suggests measures of global surgery that could provide opportunities for AHCs and surgical departments to expand missions of service, education, and research and enhance institutional reputation while achieving societal impact.

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U2 - 10.1016/j.jamcollsurg.2018.07.661

DO - 10.1016/j.jamcollsurg.2018.07.661

M3 - Article

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AN - SCOPUS:85054790153

VL - 227

SP - 455-466.e6

JO - Journal of the American College of Surgeons

JF - Journal of the American College of Surgeons

SN - 1072-7515

IS - 4

ER -