Validation of oxygen saturation measurements in a canine model of hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier infusion.

Jonathan S. Jahr, Fedor Lurie, Bernd Driessen, Zuping Tang, Richard F. Louie, Gerald J Kost

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

This study was designed to validate oxygen saturation measurements from the NOVA CO-Oximeter (NOVA Biomedical Corporation, Waltham, MA), the i-STAT System (Sensor Devices, Waukesha, WI), and the Corning 170 blood gas analyzer (Bayer Corporation, East Walpole, MA) under conditions similar to the clinical application of a hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier (HBOC, hemoglobin glutamer-200 [bovine]; Oxyglobin, Biopure Corporation, Cambridge, MA). A canine model was used for both in vitro and in vivo experiments. In vivo experiments were conducted in a canine laboratory, and in vitro experiments were conducted in a tonometry laboratory. Study subjects were six mixed-breed dogs, each weighing approximately 30 kg. In the first set of experiments, the target blood po(2) levels were reached by tonometry. In the second set of experiments, quantitative measurements of total oxygen content with the LEXO2CON-K (HOSPEX Fiberoptics, Chestnut Hill, MA) were performed, immediately followed by measurements with the NOVA CO-Oximeter and the i-STAT system. HBOC was added in concentrations of 16.2, 32.5, 65, and 97.5 g/L. To analyze the clinical significance of the differences in the results obtained with the each investigated instrument, blood samples from dogs treated with HBOC after acute hemorrhagic shock were used. Oxygen saturation, oxygen content, and po(2) were measured. There was a strong correlation between the oxygen saturation values measured with the investigated instruments in samples after tonometry and known po(2). The total calculated oxygen content varied by 5% based on results generated by calculations using the investigated instruments. The results did not change with different oxygenation of the sample. The differences among methods were not significant when the HBOC concentration was 16.2 g/L. Higher concentrations of HBOC increased the difference between calculated and measured oxygen content; the i-STAT system demonstrated a greater deviation compared with the results of the other two instruments. Systemic oxygen uptake using the investigated instruments showed a high correlation with values based on LEXO2CON-K measurements (R = 0.97 for CO-Oximeter, R = 0.96 for Corning 170 blood gas analyzer, and R = 0.79 for i-STAT system). Systemic oxygen uptake values based on CO-Oximeter and Corning 170 blood gas analyzer data showed 75% accuracy; i-STAT system accuracy was 63% for control samples and 50% for samples after HBOC infusion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)21-28
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Therapeutics
Volume10
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Canidae
Hemoglobins
Oxygen
Carbon Monoxide
Manometry
Gases
Dogs
Hemorrhagic Shock
Equipment and Supplies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Validation of oxygen saturation measurements in a canine model of hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier infusion. / Jahr, Jonathan S.; Lurie, Fedor; Driessen, Bernd; Tang, Zuping; Louie, Richard F.; Kost, Gerald J.

In: American Journal of Therapeutics, Vol. 10, No. 1, 01.2003, p. 21-28.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jahr, Jonathan S. ; Lurie, Fedor ; Driessen, Bernd ; Tang, Zuping ; Louie, Richard F. ; Kost, Gerald J. / Validation of oxygen saturation measurements in a canine model of hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier infusion. In: American Journal of Therapeutics. 2003 ; Vol. 10, No. 1. pp. 21-28.
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