Vagal afferents are essential for maximal resection-induced intestinal adaptive growth in orally fed rats

David W. Nelson, Xiaowen Liu, Jens J. Holst, Helen E Raybould, Denise M. Ney

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9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Small bowel resection stimulates intestinal adaptive growth by a neuroendocrine process thought to involve both sympathetic and parasympathetic innervation and enterotrophic hormones such as glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2). We investigated whether capsaicin-sensitive vagal afferent neurons are essential for maximal resection-induced intestinal growth. Rats received systemic or perivagal capsaicin or ganglionectomy before 70% midjejunoileal resection or transection and were fed orally or by total parenteral nutrition (TPN) for 7 days after surgery. Growth of residual bowel was assessed by changes in mucosal mass, protein, DNA, and histology. Both systemic and perivagal capsaicin significantly attenuated by 48-100% resection-induced increases in ileal mucosal mass, protein, and DNA in rats fed orally. Villus height was significantly reduced in resected rats given capsaicin compared with vehicle. Sucrase specific activity in jejunal mucosa was not significantly different; ileal mucosal sucrase specific activity was significantly increased by resection in capsaicin-treated rats. Capsaicin did not alter the 57% increase in ileal proglucagon mRNA or the 150% increase in plasma concentration of bioactive GLP-2 resulting from resection in orally fed rats. Ablation of spinal/splanchnic innervation by ganglionectomy failed to attenuate resection-induced adaptive growth. In TPN rats, capsaicin did not attenuate resection-induced mucosal growth. We conclude that vagal afferents are not essential for GLP-2 secretion when the ileum has direct contact with luminal nutrients after resection. In summary, vagal afferent neurons are essential for maximal resection-induced intestinal adaptation through a mechanism that appears to involve stimulation by luminal nutrients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology
Volume291
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006

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Keywords

  • Capsaicin
  • Glucagon-like peptide-2
  • Parenteral nutrition
  • Proglucagon
  • Sucrase

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

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