Vaccination of pregnant macaques protects newborns against mucosal simian immunodeficiency virus infection

Koen K.A. Van Rompay, Moses G. Otsyula, Ross P. Tarara, Don R. Canfield, Christopher J. Berardi, Michael B. McChesney, Marta Marthas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Scopus citations

Abstract

Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection of newborn rhesus macaques is a rapid, sensitive animal model of human pediatric AIDS. Newborn macaques were readily infected by uncloned SIV(mac) following oral- conjunctival exposure and had persistently high viremia and rapid development of AIDS. In contrast, when 3 pregnant macaques were vaccinated against SIV, 2 of the newborns that had transplacentally acquired antiviral antibodies were protected against mucosal SIV infection at birth. These results suggest that intervention strategies such as active immunization of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected pregnant women and anti-HIV immunoglobulin administration may decrease the rate of perinatal HIV infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1327-1335
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume173
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

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    Van Rompay, K. K. A., Otsyula, M. G., Tarara, R. P., Canfield, D. R., Berardi, C. J., McChesney, M. B., & Marthas, M. (1996). Vaccination of pregnant macaques protects newborns against mucosal simian immunodeficiency virus infection. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 173(6), 1327-1335. https://doi.org/10.1093/infdis/173.6.1327