Utility of systems network analysis for understanding complexity in primate behavioral management

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Network analysis focuses on the patterns of relationships that arise among interacting social and other physical entities. Its ability to mathematically represent both direct and indirect connections has made social network analysis a key approach for examining and quantifying complexity in systems, including the complexity of social relationships and social dynamics found in primate groups. To date, both standard and computational network approaches have been used to successfully identify (1) risk factors leading to deleterious aggression in captive groups of macaques, such as matrilineal fragmentation, presence of natal males, and the absence of a skewed power structure that supports conflict policing; and (2) the social dynamics, including interdependence across aggression and status networks, which underlie a critical tipping point in network structure that is predictive of deleterious aggression and social collapse.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationHandbook of Primate Behavioral Management
PublisherCRC Press
Pages157-184
Number of pages28
ISBN (Electronic)9781498731966
ISBN (Print)9781498731959
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Fingerprint

Systems Analysis
Aggression
Primates
aggression
Aptitude
social networks
Macaca
Social Support
risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • veterinary(all)
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Utility of systems network analysis for understanding complexity in primate behavioral management. / Mccowan, Brenda; Beisner, Brianne.

Handbook of Primate Behavioral Management. CRC Press, 2017. p. 157-184.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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