Using standardized patients to evaluate screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) knowledge and skill acquisition for internal medicine residents

Jason M. Satterfield, Patricia Osullivan, Derek D. Satre, Janice Y. Tsoh, Steven L. Batki, Kathy Julian, Elinore F. McCance-Katz, Maria Wamsley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Comprehensive clinical competency curricula for hazardous drinking and substance use disorders (SUDs) exists for medical students, residents, and practicing health care providers. Evaluations of these curricula typically focus on learner attitudes and knowledge, although changes in clinical skills are of greater interest and utility. The authors present a pre-post clinical skill evaluation of a 10-hour screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) curriculum for hazardous drinking and SUDs for primary care internal medicine residents using standardized patient examinations to better determine the impact of SBIRT training on clinical practice. Residents had large improvements in history taking, substance use screening skills, SUD assessment and diagnostic skills, and in SBIRT knowledge, including documentation, systems, and diversity issues. Residents made moderate improvements in brief intervention skills. Future SBIRT curricular evaluations would ideally include a controlled comparison with larger samples from multiple institutions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)303-307
Number of pages5
JournalSubstance Abuse
Volume33
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2012

Fingerprint

Internal Medicine
Clinical Competence
Referral and Consultation
Curriculum
Substance-Related Disorders
Hazardous Substances
Drinking
Therapeutics
Medical Students
Documentation
Health Personnel
Primary Health Care

Keywords

  • Graduate medical education
  • SBIRT
  • standardized patients
  • substance use disorders

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Using standardized patients to evaluate screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) knowledge and skill acquisition for internal medicine residents. / Satterfield, Jason M.; Osullivan, Patricia; Satre, Derek D.; Tsoh, Janice Y.; Batki, Steven L.; Julian, Kathy; McCance-Katz, Elinore F.; Wamsley, Maria.

In: Substance Abuse, Vol. 33, No. 3, 01.07.2012, p. 303-307.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Satterfield, Jason M. ; Osullivan, Patricia ; Satre, Derek D. ; Tsoh, Janice Y. ; Batki, Steven L. ; Julian, Kathy ; McCance-Katz, Elinore F. ; Wamsley, Maria. / Using standardized patients to evaluate screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) knowledge and skill acquisition for internal medicine residents. In: Substance Abuse. 2012 ; Vol. 33, No. 3. pp. 303-307.
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