Using NNAPPS (Nighttime nurse and physician paging system) to maximize resident call efficiency within 2011 accreditation council for graduate medical education (ACGME) work hour restrictions

Jason B. Young, Aaron C. Baker, Judie K. Boehmer, Karen M. Briede, Shirley A. Thomas, Cheryl L. Patzer, Christina Pineda, Gina A. Cates, Joseph M Galante

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To assess if implementing Nighttime Nurse and Physician Paging System (NNAPPS) would improve nurse and physician communication as well as reduce the number of nonurgent pages to residents taking overnight call. Design: NNAPPS was implemented on the busiest General Surgery and Transplant wards at our University Hospital. We conducted 2 prospective studies that logged pages received by on call surgery residents for 2-month blocks. The logs captured time, source, reason, and action resulting from pages. Independent reviewers determined urgency of the pages. Primary outcome measures were comparison of average nonurgent pages, total pages and total pages per patient during a night shift between the NNAPPS ward and all other wards that care for surgical patients. Setting: University teaching hospital. Participants: General surgery residents working overnight call shifts on nine surgical services. Results: In both studies combined, there were a total of 107 night shifts during which 771 pages were received. Total census was 1179 patients. Nurses initiated most pages (67%). Eight percent of pages interrupted patient care, while 40% of pages interrupted resident sleep. Most pages resulted in either a "new order" (39%) or "patient assessment" (22%), while 36% resulted in "no action." Most pages (56%) were "urgent," 25% "nonurgent," and 19% "unable to determine urgency." Regarding the Transplant ward, significant differences (p < 0.05) existed between average nonurgent pages (0.46 vs 2.14), total pages (3.69 vs 6.14) and total pages/patient during a shift (0.38 vs 0.68) when comparing pre- and post-NNAPPS data. Conclusions: NNAPPS significantly reduced nonurgent pages, total pages and pages per patient during a night shift compared to services with conventional systems. Streamlined paging systems lead to more efficient communication between providers and decrease the nonurgent pages to residents. NNAPPS continued high standards of patient care and improved sleep patterns for residents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)819-825
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Surgical Education
Volume69
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2012

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Graduate Medical Education
Accreditation
accreditation
nurse
Nurses
physician
graduate
resident
Physicians
efficiency
education
surgery
Patient Care
sleep
patient care
Sleep
Communication
Transplants
university teaching
communication

Keywords

  • ACGME
  • duty hours
  • paging system
  • resident work hours
  • surgery resident
  • work hour restrictions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Education

Cite this

Using NNAPPS (Nighttime nurse and physician paging system) to maximize resident call efficiency within 2011 accreditation council for graduate medical education (ACGME) work hour restrictions. / Young, Jason B.; Baker, Aaron C.; Boehmer, Judie K.; Briede, Karen M.; Thomas, Shirley A.; Patzer, Cheryl L.; Pineda, Christina; Cates, Gina A.; Galante, Joseph M.

In: Journal of Surgical Education, Vol. 69, No. 6, 11.2012, p. 819-825.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Young, Jason B. ; Baker, Aaron C. ; Boehmer, Judie K. ; Briede, Karen M. ; Thomas, Shirley A. ; Patzer, Cheryl L. ; Pineda, Christina ; Cates, Gina A. ; Galante, Joseph M. / Using NNAPPS (Nighttime nurse and physician paging system) to maximize resident call efficiency within 2011 accreditation council for graduate medical education (ACGME) work hour restrictions. In: Journal of Surgical Education. 2012 ; Vol. 69, No. 6. pp. 819-825.
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abstract = "Objectives: To assess if implementing Nighttime Nurse and Physician Paging System (NNAPPS) would improve nurse and physician communication as well as reduce the number of nonurgent pages to residents taking overnight call. Design: NNAPPS was implemented on the busiest General Surgery and Transplant wards at our University Hospital. We conducted 2 prospective studies that logged pages received by on call surgery residents for 2-month blocks. The logs captured time, source, reason, and action resulting from pages. Independent reviewers determined urgency of the pages. Primary outcome measures were comparison of average nonurgent pages, total pages and total pages per patient during a night shift between the NNAPPS ward and all other wards that care for surgical patients. Setting: University teaching hospital. Participants: General surgery residents working overnight call shifts on nine surgical services. Results: In both studies combined, there were a total of 107 night shifts during which 771 pages were received. Total census was 1179 patients. Nurses initiated most pages (67{\%}). Eight percent of pages interrupted patient care, while 40{\%} of pages interrupted resident sleep. Most pages resulted in either a {"}new order{"} (39{\%}) or {"}patient assessment{"} (22{\%}), while 36{\%} resulted in {"}no action.{"} Most pages (56{\%}) were {"}urgent,{"} 25{\%} {"}nonurgent,{"} and 19{\%} {"}unable to determine urgency.{"} Regarding the Transplant ward, significant differences (p < 0.05) existed between average nonurgent pages (0.46 vs 2.14), total pages (3.69 vs 6.14) and total pages/patient during a shift (0.38 vs 0.68) when comparing pre- and post-NNAPPS data. Conclusions: NNAPPS significantly reduced nonurgent pages, total pages and pages per patient during a night shift compared to services with conventional systems. Streamlined paging systems lead to more efficient communication between providers and decrease the nonurgent pages to residents. NNAPPS continued high standards of patient care and improved sleep patterns for residents.",
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