Using molecular biology to maximize concurrent training

Keith Baar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Very few sports use only endurance or strength. Outside of running long distances on a flat surface and power-lifting, practically all sports require some combination of endurance and strength. Endurance and strength can be developed simultaneously to some degree. However, the development of a high level of endurance seems to prohibit the development or maintenance of muscle mass and strength. This interaction between endurance and strength is called the concurrent training effect. This review specifically defines the concurrent training effect, discusses the potential molecular mechanisms underlying this effect, and proposes strategies to maximize strength and endurance in the high-level athlete.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S117-S125
JournalSports Medicine
Volume44
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2014

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Sports
Molecular Biology
Muscle Strength
Running
Athletes
Maintenance
Haemophilus influenzae type b-polysaccharide vaccine-diphtheria toxoid conjugate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Using molecular biology to maximize concurrent training. / Baar, Keith.

In: Sports Medicine, Vol. 44, 01.11.2014, p. S117-S125.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Baar, Keith. / Using molecular biology to maximize concurrent training. In: Sports Medicine. 2014 ; Vol. 44. pp. S117-S125.
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