Using intermittent synchronization to compensate for rhythmic body motion during autonomous surgical cutting and debridement

Vatsal Patel, Sanjay Krishnan, Aimee Goncalves, Carolyn Chen, Walter D Boyd, Ken Goldberg

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Anatomical structures are rarely static during a surgical procedure due to breathing, heartbeats, and peristaltic movements. Inspired by observing an expert surgeon, we propose an intermittent synchronization with the extrema of the rhythmic motion (i.e., the lowest velocity windows). We performed 2 experiments: (1) pattern cutting and (2) debridement. In (1), we found that the intermittent synchronization approach, while 1.8× slower than tracking motion, is significantly more robust to noise and control latency, and it reduces the max cutting error by 2.6× except when motion is along 3 or more orthogonal axes. In (2), a baseline approach with no synchronization succeeds in 62% of debridement attempts while intermittent synchronization achieves an 80% success rate.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2018 International Symposium on Medical Robotics, ISMR 2018
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages1-6
Number of pages6
Volume2018-January
ISBN (Electronic)9781538625125
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 6 2018
Externally publishedYes
Event2018 International Symposium on Medical Robotics, ISMR 2018 - Atlanta, United States
Duration: Mar 1 2018Mar 3 2018

Other

Other2018 International Symposium on Medical Robotics, ISMR 2018
CountryUnited States
CityAtlanta
Period3/1/183/3/18

Fingerprint

Synchronization
Experiments

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Artificial Intelligence

Cite this

Patel, V., Krishnan, S., Goncalves, A., Chen, C., Boyd, W. D., & Goldberg, K. (2018). Using intermittent synchronization to compensate for rhythmic body motion during autonomous surgical cutting and debridement. In 2018 International Symposium on Medical Robotics, ISMR 2018 (Vol. 2018-January, pp. 1-6). Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1109/ISMR.2018.8333301

Using intermittent synchronization to compensate for rhythmic body motion during autonomous surgical cutting and debridement. / Patel, Vatsal; Krishnan, Sanjay; Goncalves, Aimee; Chen, Carolyn; Boyd, Walter D; Goldberg, Ken.

2018 International Symposium on Medical Robotics, ISMR 2018. Vol. 2018-January Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2018. p. 1-6.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Patel, V, Krishnan, S, Goncalves, A, Chen, C, Boyd, WD & Goldberg, K 2018, Using intermittent synchronization to compensate for rhythmic body motion during autonomous surgical cutting and debridement. in 2018 International Symposium on Medical Robotics, ISMR 2018. vol. 2018-January, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., pp. 1-6, 2018 International Symposium on Medical Robotics, ISMR 2018, Atlanta, United States, 3/1/18. https://doi.org/10.1109/ISMR.2018.8333301
Patel V, Krishnan S, Goncalves A, Chen C, Boyd WD, Goldberg K. Using intermittent synchronization to compensate for rhythmic body motion during autonomous surgical cutting and debridement. In 2018 International Symposium on Medical Robotics, ISMR 2018. Vol. 2018-January. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. 2018. p. 1-6 https://doi.org/10.1109/ISMR.2018.8333301
Patel, Vatsal ; Krishnan, Sanjay ; Goncalves, Aimee ; Chen, Carolyn ; Boyd, Walter D ; Goldberg, Ken. / Using intermittent synchronization to compensate for rhythmic body motion during autonomous surgical cutting and debridement. 2018 International Symposium on Medical Robotics, ISMR 2018. Vol. 2018-January Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2018. pp. 1-6
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