Using a Systematic Approach and Theoretical Framework to Design a Curriculum for the Shaping Healthy Choices Program

Jessica D. Linnell, Sheri Zidenberg-Cherr, Marilyn Briggs, Rachel E. Scherr, Kelley M. Brian, Carol Hillhouse, Martin Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine the use of a systematic approach and theoretical framework to develop an inquiry-based, garden-enhanced nutrition curriculum for the Shaping Healthy Choices Program. Methods: Curriculum development occurred in 3 steps: identification of learning objectives, determination of evidence of learning, and activity development. Curriculum activities were further refined through pilot-testing, which was conducted in 2 phases. Formative data collected during pilot-testing resulted in improvements to activities. Results: Using a systematic, iterative process resulted in a curriculum called Discovering Healthy Choices, which has a strong foundation in Social Cognitive Theory and constructivist learning theory. Furthermore, the Backward Design method provided the design team with a systematic approach to ensure activities addressed targeted learning objectives and overall Shaping Healthy Choices Program goals. Conclusions and Implications: The process by which a nutrition curriculum is developed may have a direct effect on student outcomes. Processes by which nutrition curricula are designed and learning objectives are selected, and how theory and pedagogy are applied should be further investigated so that effective approaches to developing garden-enhanced nutrition interventions can be determined and replicated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)60-69.e1
JournalJournal of Nutrition Education and Behavior
Volume48
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Fingerprint

Curriculum
Learning
Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Teaching
Students
Gardens

Keywords

  • Curriculum development
  • Garden enhanced
  • Inquiry based
  • Nutrition education
  • School based

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Using a Systematic Approach and Theoretical Framework to Design a Curriculum for the Shaping Healthy Choices Program. / Linnell, Jessica D.; Zidenberg-Cherr, Sheri; Briggs, Marilyn; Scherr, Rachel E.; Brian, Kelley M.; Hillhouse, Carol; Smith, Martin.

In: Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, Vol. 48, No. 1, 01.01.2016, p. 60-69.e1.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Linnell, Jessica D. ; Zidenberg-Cherr, Sheri ; Briggs, Marilyn ; Scherr, Rachel E. ; Brian, Kelley M. ; Hillhouse, Carol ; Smith, Martin. / Using a Systematic Approach and Theoretical Framework to Design a Curriculum for the Shaping Healthy Choices Program. In: Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior. 2016 ; Vol. 48, No. 1. pp. 60-69.e1.
@article{4081745610944a69950013c5d7dffe71,
title = "Using a Systematic Approach and Theoretical Framework to Design a Curriculum for the Shaping Healthy Choices Program",
abstract = "Objective: To examine the use of a systematic approach and theoretical framework to develop an inquiry-based, garden-enhanced nutrition curriculum for the Shaping Healthy Choices Program. Methods: Curriculum development occurred in 3 steps: identification of learning objectives, determination of evidence of learning, and activity development. Curriculum activities were further refined through pilot-testing, which was conducted in 2 phases. Formative data collected during pilot-testing resulted in improvements to activities. Results: Using a systematic, iterative process resulted in a curriculum called Discovering Healthy Choices, which has a strong foundation in Social Cognitive Theory and constructivist learning theory. Furthermore, the Backward Design method provided the design team with a systematic approach to ensure activities addressed targeted learning objectives and overall Shaping Healthy Choices Program goals. Conclusions and Implications: The process by which a nutrition curriculum is developed may have a direct effect on student outcomes. Processes by which nutrition curricula are designed and learning objectives are selected, and how theory and pedagogy are applied should be further investigated so that effective approaches to developing garden-enhanced nutrition interventions can be determined and replicated.",
keywords = "Curriculum development, Garden enhanced, Inquiry based, Nutrition education, School based",
author = "Linnell, {Jessica D.} and Sheri Zidenberg-Cherr and Marilyn Briggs and Scherr, {Rachel E.} and Brian, {Kelley M.} and Carol Hillhouse and Martin Smith",
year = "2016",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jneb.2015.09.010",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "48",
pages = "60--69.e1",
journal = "Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior",
issn = "1499-4046",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Using a Systematic Approach and Theoretical Framework to Design a Curriculum for the Shaping Healthy Choices Program

AU - Linnell, Jessica D.

AU - Zidenberg-Cherr, Sheri

AU - Briggs, Marilyn

AU - Scherr, Rachel E.

AU - Brian, Kelley M.

AU - Hillhouse, Carol

AU - Smith, Martin

PY - 2016/1/1

Y1 - 2016/1/1

N2 - Objective: To examine the use of a systematic approach and theoretical framework to develop an inquiry-based, garden-enhanced nutrition curriculum for the Shaping Healthy Choices Program. Methods: Curriculum development occurred in 3 steps: identification of learning objectives, determination of evidence of learning, and activity development. Curriculum activities were further refined through pilot-testing, which was conducted in 2 phases. Formative data collected during pilot-testing resulted in improvements to activities. Results: Using a systematic, iterative process resulted in a curriculum called Discovering Healthy Choices, which has a strong foundation in Social Cognitive Theory and constructivist learning theory. Furthermore, the Backward Design method provided the design team with a systematic approach to ensure activities addressed targeted learning objectives and overall Shaping Healthy Choices Program goals. Conclusions and Implications: The process by which a nutrition curriculum is developed may have a direct effect on student outcomes. Processes by which nutrition curricula are designed and learning objectives are selected, and how theory and pedagogy are applied should be further investigated so that effective approaches to developing garden-enhanced nutrition interventions can be determined and replicated.

AB - Objective: To examine the use of a systematic approach and theoretical framework to develop an inquiry-based, garden-enhanced nutrition curriculum for the Shaping Healthy Choices Program. Methods: Curriculum development occurred in 3 steps: identification of learning objectives, determination of evidence of learning, and activity development. Curriculum activities were further refined through pilot-testing, which was conducted in 2 phases. Formative data collected during pilot-testing resulted in improvements to activities. Results: Using a systematic, iterative process resulted in a curriculum called Discovering Healthy Choices, which has a strong foundation in Social Cognitive Theory and constructivist learning theory. Furthermore, the Backward Design method provided the design team with a systematic approach to ensure activities addressed targeted learning objectives and overall Shaping Healthy Choices Program goals. Conclusions and Implications: The process by which a nutrition curriculum is developed may have a direct effect on student outcomes. Processes by which nutrition curricula are designed and learning objectives are selected, and how theory and pedagogy are applied should be further investigated so that effective approaches to developing garden-enhanced nutrition interventions can be determined and replicated.

KW - Curriculum development

KW - Garden enhanced

KW - Inquiry based

KW - Nutrition education

KW - School based

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84953369221&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84953369221&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jneb.2015.09.010

DO - 10.1016/j.jneb.2015.09.010

M3 - Article

VL - 48

SP - 60-69.e1

JO - Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior

JF - Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior

SN - 1499-4046

IS - 1

ER -