Usefulness of apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A-I ratio to predict coronary artery disease independent of the metabolic syndrome in African Americans

Enkhmaa Byambaa, Anuurad Erdembileg, Zhiyuan Zhang, Thomas A. Pearson, Lars Berglund

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Abstract

Studies have demonstrated that the apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A-I (apoB/apoA-I) ratio predicts cardiovascular risk better than any of the cholesterol indexes. A number of factors that define the metabolic syndrome (MS) differ across African-American and European-American ethnicities. We assessed the relation of the apoB/apoA-I ratio to MS and coronary artery disease (CAD) in 224 African Americans and 304 European Americans. The MS was defined using the revised National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria, and CAD was assessed as <50% stenosis or a continuous cardiovascular score (0 to 75). The European Americans had a greater apoB/apoA-I ratio than the African Americans (1.15 vs 1.07, p = 0.008). The apoB/apoA-I ratio was associated with presence of the MS in both European Americans (odds ratio 5.9, 95% confidence interval 2.53 to 13.57, p <0.001) and African Americans (odds ratio 8.3, 95% confidence interval 3.52 to 19.25, p <0.001) and was greater in subjects with the MS than in those without the MS (1.21 vs 1.04, p <0.001, for European Americans and 1.20 vs 0.94, p <0.001, for African Americans). A stepwise increase was seen in the prevalence of the MS across the apoB/apoA-I ratio tertiles in both ethnic groups (chi-square = 13.1, p <0.001, for European Americans and chi-square = 19.6, p <0.001, for African Americans). On multiple regression analyses, the apoB/apoA-I ratio independently predicted CAD in African Americans (β = 0.242, p = 0.011). The cardiovascular score was significantly increased across the apoB/apoA-I ratio tertiles in the European-American subjects with the MS (p = 0.001). However, this association was seen in the African-American subjects without the MS (p = 0.023). In conclusion, the apoB/apoA-I ratio differed across ethnicities and was associated with presence of the MS in both groups. Among African Americans, an elevated apoB/apoA-I ratio independently predicted a greater risk of CAD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1264-1269
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume106
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2010

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Apolipoprotein A-I
Apolipoproteins B
African Americans
Coronary Artery Disease
Odds Ratio
Cholesterol
Confidence Intervals
Ethnic Groups
Pathologic Constriction
Regression Analysis
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

@article{999e05bc2610449c9c6504c18f434e4b,
title = "Usefulness of apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A-I ratio to predict coronary artery disease independent of the metabolic syndrome in African Americans",
abstract = "Studies have demonstrated that the apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A-I (apoB/apoA-I) ratio predicts cardiovascular risk better than any of the cholesterol indexes. A number of factors that define the metabolic syndrome (MS) differ across African-American and European-American ethnicities. We assessed the relation of the apoB/apoA-I ratio to MS and coronary artery disease (CAD) in 224 African Americans and 304 European Americans. The MS was defined using the revised National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria, and CAD was assessed as <50{\%} stenosis or a continuous cardiovascular score (0 to 75). The European Americans had a greater apoB/apoA-I ratio than the African Americans (1.15 vs 1.07, p = 0.008). The apoB/apoA-I ratio was associated with presence of the MS in both European Americans (odds ratio 5.9, 95{\%} confidence interval 2.53 to 13.57, p <0.001) and African Americans (odds ratio 8.3, 95{\%} confidence interval 3.52 to 19.25, p <0.001) and was greater in subjects with the MS than in those without the MS (1.21 vs 1.04, p <0.001, for European Americans and 1.20 vs 0.94, p <0.001, for African Americans). A stepwise increase was seen in the prevalence of the MS across the apoB/apoA-I ratio tertiles in both ethnic groups (chi-square = 13.1, p <0.001, for European Americans and chi-square = 19.6, p <0.001, for African Americans). On multiple regression analyses, the apoB/apoA-I ratio independently predicted CAD in African Americans (β = 0.242, p = 0.011). The cardiovascular score was significantly increased across the apoB/apoA-I ratio tertiles in the European-American subjects with the MS (p = 0.001). However, this association was seen in the African-American subjects without the MS (p = 0.023). In conclusion, the apoB/apoA-I ratio differed across ethnicities and was associated with presence of the MS in both groups. Among African Americans, an elevated apoB/apoA-I ratio independently predicted a greater risk of CAD.",
author = "Enkhmaa Byambaa and Anuurad Erdembileg and Zhiyuan Zhang and Pearson, {Thomas A.} and Lars Berglund",
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language = "English (US)",
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T1 - Usefulness of apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A-I ratio to predict coronary artery disease independent of the metabolic syndrome in African Americans

AU - Byambaa, Enkhmaa

AU - Erdembileg, Anuurad

AU - Zhang, Zhiyuan

AU - Pearson, Thomas A.

AU - Berglund, Lars

PY - 2010/11/1

Y1 - 2010/11/1

N2 - Studies have demonstrated that the apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A-I (apoB/apoA-I) ratio predicts cardiovascular risk better than any of the cholesterol indexes. A number of factors that define the metabolic syndrome (MS) differ across African-American and European-American ethnicities. We assessed the relation of the apoB/apoA-I ratio to MS and coronary artery disease (CAD) in 224 African Americans and 304 European Americans. The MS was defined using the revised National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria, and CAD was assessed as <50% stenosis or a continuous cardiovascular score (0 to 75). The European Americans had a greater apoB/apoA-I ratio than the African Americans (1.15 vs 1.07, p = 0.008). The apoB/apoA-I ratio was associated with presence of the MS in both European Americans (odds ratio 5.9, 95% confidence interval 2.53 to 13.57, p <0.001) and African Americans (odds ratio 8.3, 95% confidence interval 3.52 to 19.25, p <0.001) and was greater in subjects with the MS than in those without the MS (1.21 vs 1.04, p <0.001, for European Americans and 1.20 vs 0.94, p <0.001, for African Americans). A stepwise increase was seen in the prevalence of the MS across the apoB/apoA-I ratio tertiles in both ethnic groups (chi-square = 13.1, p <0.001, for European Americans and chi-square = 19.6, p <0.001, for African Americans). On multiple regression analyses, the apoB/apoA-I ratio independently predicted CAD in African Americans (β = 0.242, p = 0.011). The cardiovascular score was significantly increased across the apoB/apoA-I ratio tertiles in the European-American subjects with the MS (p = 0.001). However, this association was seen in the African-American subjects without the MS (p = 0.023). In conclusion, the apoB/apoA-I ratio differed across ethnicities and was associated with presence of the MS in both groups. Among African Americans, an elevated apoB/apoA-I ratio independently predicted a greater risk of CAD.

AB - Studies have demonstrated that the apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A-I (apoB/apoA-I) ratio predicts cardiovascular risk better than any of the cholesterol indexes. A number of factors that define the metabolic syndrome (MS) differ across African-American and European-American ethnicities. We assessed the relation of the apoB/apoA-I ratio to MS and coronary artery disease (CAD) in 224 African Americans and 304 European Americans. The MS was defined using the revised National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria, and CAD was assessed as <50% stenosis or a continuous cardiovascular score (0 to 75). The European Americans had a greater apoB/apoA-I ratio than the African Americans (1.15 vs 1.07, p = 0.008). The apoB/apoA-I ratio was associated with presence of the MS in both European Americans (odds ratio 5.9, 95% confidence interval 2.53 to 13.57, p <0.001) and African Americans (odds ratio 8.3, 95% confidence interval 3.52 to 19.25, p <0.001) and was greater in subjects with the MS than in those without the MS (1.21 vs 1.04, p <0.001, for European Americans and 1.20 vs 0.94, p <0.001, for African Americans). A stepwise increase was seen in the prevalence of the MS across the apoB/apoA-I ratio tertiles in both ethnic groups (chi-square = 13.1, p <0.001, for European Americans and chi-square = 19.6, p <0.001, for African Americans). On multiple regression analyses, the apoB/apoA-I ratio independently predicted CAD in African Americans (β = 0.242, p = 0.011). The cardiovascular score was significantly increased across the apoB/apoA-I ratio tertiles in the European-American subjects with the MS (p = 0.001). However, this association was seen in the African-American subjects without the MS (p = 0.023). In conclusion, the apoB/apoA-I ratio differed across ethnicities and was associated with presence of the MS in both groups. Among African Americans, an elevated apoB/apoA-I ratio independently predicted a greater risk of CAD.

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