Use of urine cortisol

Creatinine ratio versus adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation testing for monitoring mitotane treatment of pituitary- dependent hyperadrenocorticism in dogs

J. M. Angles, Edward C Feldman, Richard W Nelson, M. S. Feldman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective - To evaluate use of urine cortisol-to-creatinine ratio (UC:C) as a means of monitoring response to long-term mitotane treatment in dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism. Design - Prospective uncontrolled study. Animals - 101 dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism. Procedure - Urine samples were obtained from dogs on the morning an ACTH stimulation test was performed, and owners were asked their opinion on the health of their dog to monitor response to mitotane treatment. Urine was assayed for cortisol and creatinine concentrations, and UC:C was calculated. The UC:C was compared with post-ACTH plasma cortisol concentration. Results - Post-ACTH plasma cortisol concentration was used to categorize each dog's response to mitotane treatment. The UC:C did not correlate satisfactorily with results of ACTH stimulation testing. Twenty- seven of 85 (32%) dogs would have been incorrectly considered as having received appropriate doses using UC:C. In addition, 16 dogs that received overdoses could not be distinguished from 29 dogs that received appropriate doses. Clinical Implications - UC:C does not provide a consistent, correct assessment of mitotane-induced adrenocortical destruction. The ACTH stimulation test, although more time-consuming and expensive, is recommended for monitoring response to mitotane treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1002-1004
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume211
Issue number8
StatePublished - 1997

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mitotane
Mitotane
Adrenocortical Hyperfunction
hyperadrenocorticism
corticotropin
Adrenocorticotropic Hormone
creatinine
cortisol
Hydrocortisone
Creatinine
urine
Urine
Dogs
monitoring
dogs
testing
overdose
dosage
prospective studies
Prospective Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

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title = "Use of urine cortisol: Creatinine ratio versus adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation testing for monitoring mitotane treatment of pituitary- dependent hyperadrenocorticism in dogs",
abstract = "Objective - To evaluate use of urine cortisol-to-creatinine ratio (UC:C) as a means of monitoring response to long-term mitotane treatment in dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism. Design - Prospective uncontrolled study. Animals - 101 dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism. Procedure - Urine samples were obtained from dogs on the morning an ACTH stimulation test was performed, and owners were asked their opinion on the health of their dog to monitor response to mitotane treatment. Urine was assayed for cortisol and creatinine concentrations, and UC:C was calculated. The UC:C was compared with post-ACTH plasma cortisol concentration. Results - Post-ACTH plasma cortisol concentration was used to categorize each dog's response to mitotane treatment. The UC:C did not correlate satisfactorily with results of ACTH stimulation testing. Twenty- seven of 85 (32{\%}) dogs would have been incorrectly considered as having received appropriate doses using UC:C. In addition, 16 dogs that received overdoses could not be distinguished from 29 dogs that received appropriate doses. Clinical Implications - UC:C does not provide a consistent, correct assessment of mitotane-induced adrenocortical destruction. The ACTH stimulation test, although more time-consuming and expensive, is recommended for monitoring response to mitotane treatment.",
author = "Angles, {J. M.} and Feldman, {Edward C} and Nelson, {Richard W} and Feldman, {M. S.}",
year = "1997",
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AU - Nelson, Richard W

AU - Feldman, M. S.

PY - 1997

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AB - Objective - To evaluate use of urine cortisol-to-creatinine ratio (UC:C) as a means of monitoring response to long-term mitotane treatment in dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism. Design - Prospective uncontrolled study. Animals - 101 dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism. Procedure - Urine samples were obtained from dogs on the morning an ACTH stimulation test was performed, and owners were asked their opinion on the health of their dog to monitor response to mitotane treatment. Urine was assayed for cortisol and creatinine concentrations, and UC:C was calculated. The UC:C was compared with post-ACTH plasma cortisol concentration. Results - Post-ACTH plasma cortisol concentration was used to categorize each dog's response to mitotane treatment. The UC:C did not correlate satisfactorily with results of ACTH stimulation testing. Twenty- seven of 85 (32%) dogs would have been incorrectly considered as having received appropriate doses using UC:C. In addition, 16 dogs that received overdoses could not be distinguished from 29 dogs that received appropriate doses. Clinical Implications - UC:C does not provide a consistent, correct assessment of mitotane-induced adrenocortical destruction. The ACTH stimulation test, although more time-consuming and expensive, is recommended for monitoring response to mitotane treatment.

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