Use of the urine cortisol: creatinine ratio to monitor treatment response in dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism

L. Guptill, J. C. Scott-Moncrieff, G. Bottoms, L. Glickman, M. Johnson, N. Glickman, Richard W Nelson, E. Bertoy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine the usefulness of measureing urine cortisol:creatinine ratio (UCCR) as a means of monitoring response to mitotane treatment in dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism (PDH). Design: Case series. Animals: 51 clinically normal dogs and 21 dogs with PDH. Procedure: The reference range for the UCCR was determined by measuring the ratio in 51 clinically normal dogs. The usefulness of measuring UCCR in evaluating response of 21 dogs with PDH to treatment with mitotane was evaluated by comparing ACTH-stimulated blood cortisol concentrations with UCCR at the end of the induction phase of treatment (13 dogs) and during the maintenance phase of tretment (21) . Results: UCCR was not useful for identifying dogs with inadequate adrenal reserves at the end of the induction phase of treatment or during the maintenance phase. The UCCR was useful for identifying dogs in which control of cortisol secretion was not adequate. Clinical implications: UCCR should not be used for evaluation of dogs during the induction phase of treatment, because the potential consequences of not identifying dogs with inadequate adrenal reserves are great. The UCCR may be useful as an adjunct means of monitoring treatment response during the maintenance phase of treatment. However, the ACTH stimulation test remains a necessary component when monitoring response to treatment in dogs with PDH receiving mitotane.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1158-1161
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume210
Issue number8
StatePublished - Apr 15 1997

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Adrenocortical Hyperfunction
hyperadrenocorticism
creatinine
cortisol
Hydrocortisone
Creatinine
urine
Urine
Dogs
monitoring
dogs
mitotane
Mitotane
Maintenance
corticotropin
Adrenocorticotropic Hormone
Reference Values

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Guptill, L., Scott-Moncrieff, J. C., Bottoms, G., Glickman, L., Johnson, M., Glickman, N., ... Bertoy, E. (1997). Use of the urine cortisol: creatinine ratio to monitor treatment response in dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism. Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 210(8), 1158-1161.

Use of the urine cortisol : creatinine ratio to monitor treatment response in dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism. / Guptill, L.; Scott-Moncrieff, J. C.; Bottoms, G.; Glickman, L.; Johnson, M.; Glickman, N.; Nelson, Richard W; Bertoy, E.

In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Vol. 210, No. 8, 15.04.1997, p. 1158-1161.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Guptill, L, Scott-Moncrieff, JC, Bottoms, G, Glickman, L, Johnson, M, Glickman, N, Nelson, RW & Bertoy, E 1997, 'Use of the urine cortisol: creatinine ratio to monitor treatment response in dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism', Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, vol. 210, no. 8, pp. 1158-1161.
Guptill, L. ; Scott-Moncrieff, J. C. ; Bottoms, G. ; Glickman, L. ; Johnson, M. ; Glickman, N. ; Nelson, Richard W ; Bertoy, E. / Use of the urine cortisol : creatinine ratio to monitor treatment response in dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism. In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. 1997 ; Vol. 210, No. 8. pp. 1158-1161.
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