Use of the caudolateral curvilinear osteophyte as an early marker for future development of osteoarthritis associated with hip dysplasia in dogs

Michelle Y. Powers, Daryl N. Biery, Dennis F. Lawler, Richard H. Evans, Frances S. Shofer, Philipp Mayhew, Thomas P. Gregor, Richard D. Kealy, Gail K. Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective - To determine the relationship between the caudolateral curvilinear osteophyte (CCO) and osteoarthritis associated with hip dysplasia in dogs. Design - Longitudinal cohort study. Animals - 48 Labrador Retrievers from 7 litters. Procedure - In each of 24 sex- and size-matched pairs fed the same diet, a restricted-fed dog was fed 25% less than a control dog for life. The dogs' hips were evaluated in the standard ventrodorsal hip-extended radiographic projection at 16, 30, and 52 weeks of age and then yearly for life. Histologic examination of hip joint tissues was performed on 45 dogs. Results - Median age at death was 11.2 years. Adjusting for feeding group, dogs with a CCO were 3.7 times as likely to develop radiographic signs of osteoarthritis than those without a CCO. Stratified by diet, 100% of the control dogs with a CCO developed radiographic signs of osteoarthritis and 55% of restricted-fed dogs with a CCO developed radiographic signs of osteoarthritis. The CCO was the first radiographic change seen in 22 of 29 (76%) dogs with osteoarthritis. Overall, 35 of 37 (95%) dogs with a CCO had histopathologic lesions of osteoarthritis. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Results indicate a relationship between a CCO on the femoral neck and subsequent development of radiographic signs of osteoarthritis in Labrador Retrievers evaluated over their life span. A CCO is an important early radiographic indication of osteoarthritis associated with canine hip dysplasia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)233-237
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume225
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 15 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Osteophyte
hip dysplasia
Hip Dislocation
osteoarthritis
Osteoarthritis
Dogs
dogs
hips
Newfoundland and Labrador
Labrador Retriever
Hip
Canine Hip Dysplasia
canine hip dysplasia
Diet
Femur Neck
Hip Joint
thighs
cohort studies
diet
lesions (animal)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Use of the caudolateral curvilinear osteophyte as an early marker for future development of osteoarthritis associated with hip dysplasia in dogs. / Powers, Michelle Y.; Biery, Daryl N.; Lawler, Dennis F.; Evans, Richard H.; Shofer, Frances S.; Mayhew, Philipp; Gregor, Thomas P.; Kealy, Richard D.; Smith, Gail K.

In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Vol. 225, No. 2, 15.07.2004, p. 233-237.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Powers, Michelle Y. ; Biery, Daryl N. ; Lawler, Dennis F. ; Evans, Richard H. ; Shofer, Frances S. ; Mayhew, Philipp ; Gregor, Thomas P. ; Kealy, Richard D. ; Smith, Gail K. / Use of the caudolateral curvilinear osteophyte as an early marker for future development of osteoarthritis associated with hip dysplasia in dogs. In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. 2004 ; Vol. 225, No. 2. pp. 233-237.
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