Use of lufenuron for treating fungal infections of dogs and cats: 297 cases (1997-1999)

Yair Ben-Ziony, Boaz Arzi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective - To evaluate use of lufenuron for treating cutaneous fungal infections in dogs and cats. Design - Retrospective study. Animals - 156 dogs and 201 cats with dermatophytosis or superficial dermatomycoses. Procedure - Medical records were reviewed for dogs and cats that had been treated for dermatophytosis or other fungal infections by administration of lufenuron and 18 dogs and 42 cats that were not treated and served as a control group. Results - Dogs were treated once by oral administration of lufenuron tablets at doses ranging from 54.2 to 68.3 mg/kg (24.6 to 31.0 mg/lb) of body weight. Samples of skin, scrapings, and hair were obtained daily from 14 dogs with dermatophytosis; mean durations from time of treatment to time of negative fungal culture results and resolution of gross lesions were 14.5 and 20.75 days, respectively. In all treated dogs, gross lesions resolved within approximately 21 days. Cats were treated once by oral administration of lufenuron suspension, in doses ranging from 51.2 to 266 mg/kg (23.3 to 120.9 mg/lb). Samples were obtained daily from 23 cats; mean durations from time of treatment to time of negative fungal culture results and resolution of gross lesions were 8.3 and 12 days, respectively. Time to resolution of lesions in most untreated control animals was approximately 90 days. Adverse effects of treatment were not detected. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Results of this study suggest that lufenuron provides an effective, convenient, and rapid method for treating fungal infections in dogs and cats.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1510-1513
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume217
Issue number10
StatePublished - Nov 15 2000
Externally publishedYes

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lufenuron
Mycoses
Cats
Dogs
cats
dermatomycoses
dogs
lesions (animal)
infection
Tinea
oral administration
Oral Administration
Dermatomycoses
Skin
duration
fluphenacur
dosage
retrospective studies
skin (animal)
rapid methods

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Use of lufenuron for treating fungal infections of dogs and cats : 297 cases (1997-1999). / Ben-Ziony, Yair; Arzi, Boaz.

In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Vol. 217, No. 10, 15.11.2000, p. 1510-1513.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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