Use of LC-MS/MS and stable isotopes to differentiate hydroxymethyl and methyl DNA adducts from formaldehyde and nitrosodimethylamine

Kun Lu, Sessaly Craft, Jun Nakamura, Benjamin Moeller, James A. Swenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Formaldehyde is a known human and animal carcinogen that forms DNA adducts, and causes mutations. While there is widespread exposure to formaldehyde in the environment, formaldehyde is also an essential biochemical in all living cells. The presence of both endogenous and exogenous sources of formaldehyde makes it difficult to develop exposure-specific DNA biomarkers. Furthermore, chemicals such as nitrosodimethylamine form one mole of formaldehyde for every mole of methylating agent, raising questions about potential cocarcinogenesis. Formaldehyde-induced hydroxymethyl DNA adducts are not stable and need to be reduced to stable methyl adducts for detection, which adds another layer of complexity to identifying the origins of these adducts. In this study, highly sensitive mass spectrometry methods and isotope labeled compounds were used to differentiate between endogenous and exogenous hydroxymethyl and methyl DNA adducts. We demonstrate that N 2-hydroxymethyl-dG is the primary DNA adduct formed in cells following formaldehyde exposure. In addition, we show that alkylating agents induce methyl adducts at N 2-dG and N 6-dA positions, which are identical to the reduced forms of hydroxymethyl adducts arising from formaldehyde. The use of highly sensitive LC-MS/MS and isotope labeled compounds for exposure solves these challenges and provides mechanistic insights on the formation and role of these DNA adducts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)664-675
Number of pages12
JournalChemical Research in Toxicology
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 19 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Dimethylnitrosamine
DNA Adducts
Isotopes
Formaldehyde
Cocarcinogenesis
Alkylating Agents
Carcinogens
Mass Spectrometry
Biomarkers
Mass spectrometry
Mutation
Animals
DNA
Cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology

Cite this

Use of LC-MS/MS and stable isotopes to differentiate hydroxymethyl and methyl DNA adducts from formaldehyde and nitrosodimethylamine. / Lu, Kun; Craft, Sessaly; Nakamura, Jun; Moeller, Benjamin; Swenberg, James A.

In: Chemical Research in Toxicology, Vol. 25, No. 3, 19.03.2012, p. 664-675.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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