Use of avian bornavirus isolates to induce proventricular dilatation disease in conures

Patricia Gray, Sharman Hoppes, Paulette Suchodolski, Negin Mirhosseini, Susan Payne, Itamar Villanueva, H L Shivaprasad, Kirsi S. Honkavuori, Thomas Briese, Sanjay M. Reddy, Ian Tizard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

66 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Avian bornavirus (ABV) is a newly discovered member of the family Bornaviridae that has been associated with the development of a lethal neurologic syndrome in birds, termed proventricular dilatation disease (PDD). We successfully isolated and characterized ABV from the brains of 8 birds with confirmed PDD. One isolate was passed 6 times in duck embryo fibroblasts, and the infected cells were then injected intramuscularly into 2 healthy Patagonian conures (Cyanoliseus patagonis). Clinical PDD developed in both birds by 66 days postinfection. PDD was confirmed by necropsy and histopathologic examination. Reverse transcription-PCR showed that the inoculated ABV was in the brains of the 2 infected birds. A control bird that received uninfected tissue culture cells remained healthy until it was euthanized at 77 days. Necropsy and histopathologic examinations showed no abnormalities; PCR did not indicate ABV in its brain tissues.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)473-479
Number of pages7
JournalEmerging Infectious Diseases
Volume16
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2010

Fingerprint

Bornaviridae
Birds
Dilatation
Brain
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Ducks
Nervous System
Reverse Transcription
Embryonic Structures
Cell Culture Techniques
Fibroblasts

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Gray, P., Hoppes, S., Suchodolski, P., Mirhosseini, N., Payne, S., Villanueva, I., ... Tizard, I. (2010). Use of avian bornavirus isolates to induce proventricular dilatation disease in conures. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(3), 473-479. https://doi.org/10.3201/eid1603.091257

Use of avian bornavirus isolates to induce proventricular dilatation disease in conures. / Gray, Patricia; Hoppes, Sharman; Suchodolski, Paulette; Mirhosseini, Negin; Payne, Susan; Villanueva, Itamar; Shivaprasad, H L; Honkavuori, Kirsi S.; Briese, Thomas; Reddy, Sanjay M.; Tizard, Ian.

In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, Vol. 16, No. 3, 03.2010, p. 473-479.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gray, P, Hoppes, S, Suchodolski, P, Mirhosseini, N, Payne, S, Villanueva, I, Shivaprasad, HL, Honkavuori, KS, Briese, T, Reddy, SM & Tizard, I 2010, 'Use of avian bornavirus isolates to induce proventricular dilatation disease in conures', Emerging Infectious Diseases, vol. 16, no. 3, pp. 473-479. https://doi.org/10.3201/eid1603.091257
Gray P, Hoppes S, Suchodolski P, Mirhosseini N, Payne S, Villanueva I et al. Use of avian bornavirus isolates to induce proventricular dilatation disease in conures. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010 Mar;16(3):473-479. https://doi.org/10.3201/eid1603.091257
Gray, Patricia ; Hoppes, Sharman ; Suchodolski, Paulette ; Mirhosseini, Negin ; Payne, Susan ; Villanueva, Itamar ; Shivaprasad, H L ; Honkavuori, Kirsi S. ; Briese, Thomas ; Reddy, Sanjay M. ; Tizard, Ian. / Use of avian bornavirus isolates to induce proventricular dilatation disease in conures. In: Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010 ; Vol. 16, No. 3. pp. 473-479.
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