Use of an Active Intra-abdominal Drain in 67 Horses

Jorge Nieto, Jack R. Snyder, Nicholas J. Vatistas, Sharon Spier, Linda Van Hoogmoed

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective - To describe the insertion technique, efficacy, and complications associated with the use of an active (closed-suction) abdominal drain in horses. Study Design - Retrospective study. Animals - Sixty-seven horses with abdominal contamination treated by abdominal lavage and use of a closed-suction abdominal drain. Methods - Medical records of horses (1989-1996) that had a closed-suction abdominal drain were reviewed. Follow-up information was obtained by telephone interviews with owners. Results - Sixty-eight closed-suction abdominal drains were used in 67 horses that had abdominal contamination, peritonitis, or to prevent adhesion formation. The drain was placed under general anesthesia (62 horses) or in a standing position (6 horses). Abdominal lavage was performed every 4 to 12 hours and about 83% of the peritoneal lavage solution was retrieved. Minor complications associated with drain use occurred in 49% of the horses and included obstruction or slow passage of fluid through the drain in 18 horses (26%), leakage of fluid around the drain in 11 horses (16%), and subcutaneous fluid accumulation around the drain in 8 horses (12%). Incisional suppuration developed in 20 of 62 (32%) and incisional herniation in 5 of 46 (11%) horses. Conclusions - A closed-suction drain system was easily placed and was associated with only minor complications in most horses. Clinical Relevance - Active abdominal drainage and lavage is a useful adjunct in the treatment of peritonitis or as a prophylactic procedure in horses at risk of developing septic peritonitis and abdominal adhesions. Clinicians should be aware of the high incidence of minor complications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalVeterinary Surgery
Volume32
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2004

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Horses
horses
Suction
peritonitis
Therapeutic Irrigation
Peritonitis
adhesion
Peritoneal Lavage
Suppuration
intestinal obstruction
Posture
retrospective studies
General Anesthesia
Medical Records
Drainage
interviews
anesthesia
drainage
Retrospective Studies
experimental design

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Use of an Active Intra-abdominal Drain in 67 Horses. / Nieto, Jorge; Snyder, Jack R.; Vatistas, Nicholas J.; Spier, Sharon; Van Hoogmoed, Linda.

In: Veterinary Surgery, Vol. 32, No. 1, 01.2004, p. 1-7.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nieto, Jorge ; Snyder, Jack R. ; Vatistas, Nicholas J. ; Spier, Sharon ; Van Hoogmoed, Linda. / Use of an Active Intra-abdominal Drain in 67 Horses. In: Veterinary Surgery. 2004 ; Vol. 32, No. 1. pp. 1-7.
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